David Miliband refuses to rule out future leadership bid

Labour leadership runner-up tells local paper: “Who knows what will happen in the future?”

Discussing the Milibands recently with a Labour peer, I was told: "Things are terrible. They're no longer on speaking terms."

In an atmosphere of lingering resentment at Ed's leadership campaign, notably his (truthful) claim to have opposed the Iraq war, the two camps have struggled to evolve a modus vivendi. Meanwhile, David's supporters have constructed a fantasy in which their man returns to claim the crown from his treacherous brother.

With this in mind, the elder Milband's comments to the Journal are perfectly placed to keep the rumour mill churning.

He tells the local paper:

I have no plans to return to front-line politics – at the moment, that is. For now, I'm doing what's best for the party and leaving the field open for Ed to lead the party. I've got to admit I wish the leadership campaign had gone differently but who knows what will happen in the future?

For those increasingly suspicious of his political motives, David has a clear message: I'm not going anywhere.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.