Aung San Suu Kyi reunited with son after 10 years

Younger son of Burma's democracy leader granted a visa for first time in a decade.

Burma's democracy leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, has been reuinted with her younger son, Kim Aris, for the first time in a decade.

The photograph above shows the two leaving Rangoon airport after he arrived from Thailand, where he has been waiting for a visa. Since he last saw his mother, in 2000, he has repeatedly been denied a visa. It has also been a decade since she saw her older son, Alexander, and she has grandchildren she has never met.

This appears to be a significant relaxation for the military junta, who released Suu Kyi from house arrest on 13 November, less than a week after elections were held. However, reports say that they are keeping a close eye on everything she does and says -- a fact of which she is acutely aware.

It is thought that if Suu Kyi ever left Burma, she would never be allowed to return.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.