Student protests: in pictures

Despite some clashes with police, it does not look like there will be a repeat of 10 November's riot

Students across the country have taken action today in a second wave of student protests. As yet, it does not seem that there will be a repeat of the violence seen on 10 November when Tory HQ was occupied.

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Following the police admission that they underestimated the level of disorder that developed on 10 November, they are taking no risks today. Paul Lewis of the Guardian reports: "I'm reliably informed there are 800 officers deployed in London today -- three times more than were on the streets for the far larger march on 10 November."

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Above, demonstrators clash with police. While this second wave of protests is more dispersed, with more than 25,000 students taking part in marches, walkouts, occupations, and direct action across the UK, the media spotlight is inevitably on London.

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While there have not been any scenes akin to those at Millbank, protesters are angry. Above, a mob of students breaks into a police van.

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By 3.15pm, the BBC reported that three students have been arrested on suspicion of violent disorder and theft. One policeman has been injured with a broken arm. Reports of "kettling" protesters mean that the debate on this method of crowd control is likely to reopen.

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Above, protesters throw a firework at police.

Organised via social-networking sites, this demonstration is not officially affiliated with the National Union of Students, though its cause is the same: the planned rise in university fees and scrapping of educational maintenance allowance.

Many libraries have been occupied, including Oxford's Bodleian Library. There have been marches and other direct actions in Manchester, Liverpool, Sheffield, Bristol, Southampton, Oxford, Cambridge, Leeds, Newcastle, Bournemouth, Cardiff, Glasgow and Edinburgh.

But while the action is spread across the UK today, the media spotlight -- and police attention -- is inevitably on London. It's worth noting that the coalition has utilised a provision in the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005 to ban protest within one kilometre from any point on Parliament Square, despite its promise to prioritise civil liberties.

 

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Jeremy Corbyn will stay on the Labour leadership ballot paper, judge rules

Labour donor Michael Foster had challenged the decision at the High Court.

The High Court has ruled that Jeremy Corbyn should be allowed to automatically run again for Labour leader after the decision of the party's National Executive Committee was challenged. 

Corbyn declared it a "waste of time" and an attempt to overturn the right of Labour members to choose their leader.

The decision ends the hope of some anti-Corbyn Labour members that he could be excluded from the contest altogether.

The legal challenge had been brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate, who maintained he was simply seeking the views of experts.

But when the experts spoke, it was in Corbyn's favour. 

The ruling said: "Accordingly, the Judge accepted that the decision of the NEC was correct and that Mr Corbyn was entitled to be a candidate in the forthcoming election without the need for nominations."

This judgement was "wholly unaffected by political considerations", it added. 

Corbyn said: "I welcome the decision by the High Court to respect the democracy of the Labour Party.

"This has been a waste of time and resources when our party should be focused on holding the government to account.

"There should have been no question of the right of half a million Labour party members to choose their own leader being overturned. If anything, the aim should be to expand the number of voters in this election. I hope all candidates and supporters will reject any attempt to prolong this process, and that we can now proceed with the election in a comradely and respectful manner."

Iain McNicol, general secretary of the Labour Party, said: “We are delighted that the Court has upheld the authority and decision of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party. 

“We will continue with the leadership election as agreed by the NEC."

If Corbyn had been excluded, he would have had to seek the nomination of 51 MPs, which would have been difficult since just 40 voted against the no confidence motion in him. He would therefore have been effectively excluded from running. 

Owen Smith, the candidate backed by rebel MPs, told the BBC earlier he believed Corbyn should stay on the ballot paper. 

He said after the judgement: “I’m pleased the court has done the right thing and ruled that Jeremy should be on the ballot. This now puts to bed any questions about the process, so we can get on with discussing the issues that really matter."

The news was greeted with celebration by Corbyn supporters.