Goodbye and good riddance to the Dalai Lama

Here’s hoping, anyway...

News that the Dalai Lama may retire in the next year is to be welcomed by all those sick of the cant, flattery and new age-type nonsense that have long surrounded this former guest editor of French Vogue magazine - however much his followers, such as the distinguished thespians Steven Seagal and Richard Gere, or his friends in the CIA might vouch for him.

It's not that the cause of Tibet does not deserve international sympathy and attention. But it would be served far better by a purely political leadership, not one whose "mystical" aura allows for next to no examination or criticism about its aims and its strategies. I've posted before asking why it is that we think the current Dalai Lama is a living saint.

For a longer look at "His Material Highness", who due to the "blissful, thoughtless exceptionalism" with which the West regards Buddhism, "combined with a Hollywood cult that almost exceeds the power of Scientology... fused with weightless Maharishi and Bhagwan-type babble" is thought of as "a saintly god-king" exiled from "an idealised Tibet", I heartily recommend this article from Salon by Christopher Hitchens. "Far from his Holier-than-all image, the Dalai Lama supports such questionable causes as India's nuclear testing, sex with prostitutes and accepting donations from a Japanese terrorist cult," begins the introduction.

Read it and see if you don't agree with me that it's time to say good bye and good riddance to this worldly prelate. As for his retirement: there's one show I'm sure he'd always be welcome on (just think of the fee he could command). As Nigel Havers exits, who's next for the jungle? Welcome, the Dalai Lama, to "I'm a celebrity... Get me out of here!".

Sholto Byrnes is a Contributing Editor to the New Statesman
Photo: Getty
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Can Philip Hammond save the Conservatives from public anger at their DUP deal?

The Chancellor has the wriggle room to get close to the DUP's spending increase – but emotion matters more than facts in politics.

The magic money tree exists, and it is growing in Northern Ireland. That’s the attack line that Labour will throw at Theresa May in the wake of her £1bn deal with the DUP to keep her party in office.

It’s worth noting that while £1bn is a big deal in terms of Northern Ireland’s budget – just a touch under £10bn in 2016/17 – as far as the total expenditure of the British government goes, it’s peanuts.

The British government spent £778bn last year – we’re talking about spending an amount of money in Northern Ireland over the course of two years that the NHS loses in pen theft over the course of one in England. To match the increase in relative terms, you’d be looking at a £35bn increase in spending.

But, of course, political arguments are about gut instinct rather than actual numbers. The perception that the streets of Antrim are being paved by gold while the public realm in England, Scotland and Wales falls into disrepair is a real danger to the Conservatives.

But the good news for them is that last year Philip Hammond tweaked his targets to give himself greater headroom in case of a Brexit shock. Now the Tories have experienced a shock of a different kind – a Corbyn shock. That shock was partly due to the Labour leader’s good campaign and May’s bad campaign, but it was also powered by anger at cuts to schools and anger among NHS workers at Jeremy Hunt’s stewardship of the NHS. Conservative MPs have already made it clear to May that the party must not go to the country again while defending cuts to school spending.

Hammond can get to slightly under that £35bn and still stick to his targets. That will mean that the DUP still get to rave about their higher-than-average increase, while avoiding another election in which cuts to schools are front-and-centre. But whether that deprives Labour of their “cuts for you, but not for them” attack line is another question entirely. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.

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