Miliband stands firm on the 50p tax -- or does he?

Labour leader committed to 50p tax rate "for the foreseeable future".

As Mehdi noted at the weekend, Alan Johnson and Ed Miliband are engaged in a political struggle over the 50p tax. Johnson views it as a short-term response to the financial crisis and would like to scrap it at the earliest possible opportunity; Miliband views it as a social democratic achievement and would like to make it permanent.

For those who missed it, Johnson said in an interview with the Times (£):

I am only backing 50p for the times we are in. It is not ideal; five years ago (we) wouldn't have done it. Our policy has to be based on fairness and what encourages people to do well.

Today, a spokesman for Miliband has responded, insisting that "we remain committed to it for now and for the foreseeable future". That may seem clear enough but the precise formulation -- note the telling reference to "the foreseeable future" -- leaves Miliband with a significant amount of wriggle room.

Having won the argument on progressive taxation, it would be foolish for Labour to retreat now. The 50p tax is popular with voters, raises vital revenue and acts as a brake on runaway inequality. It is also an important symbol of Labour's commitment to a fairer society.

Johnson's comments on the 50p rate, combined with his firm opposition to a gradute tax (he is said to have had a "blazing row with Miliband over the issue at the party conference) represent a serious challenge to Miliband's authority. He must not back down.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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