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CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Too many have been disabled by benefits (Times) (£)

Two million people rely on incapacity benefit. Iain Duncan Smith says that he expects a quarter of them to be fit to return to work immediately.

2. We disabled people aren't shirkers (Guardian)

Alice Maynard says that disabled people like her want to contribute fully, but the cuts could push them into lifelong joblessness.

3. The wrong policy for Lib Dems to oppose (Independent)

The leading article argues that reform of university funding is overdue. The Liberal Democrats should reconsider their position, as long as social diversity is protected.

4. Don't punish students for others' excesses (Times) (£)

A huge rise in fees would only make rich universities richer. Aaron Porter maintains that a graduate tax is the answer.

5. The perils of giving in to pester power (Independent)

The only way for the government to deal with the coming storm over cuts is to stand firm and refuse to budge an inch, says Mary Anne Sieghart.

6. State lambasts west while citizens give thanks (Financial Times)

The Nobel Peace prize for the Chinese activist Liu Xiaobo could have powerful ripple effects, writes Geoff Dyer.

7. Gang up on China - that'll be value for money (Times) (£)

If they have a mind to do it, says Bill Emmott, G20 members can ease the currency wars and pull the leading culprit into line.

8. Tea Party supporters want to 'take their country back'. To where? (Guardian)

The candidates that Tea Party supporters back have actively worked to undermine their aspirations and interests, says Gary Younge.

9. America should fund Israeli settlers to leave (Financial Times)

Blanket US support for Israel should be used to create new incentives for settlers to peacefully evacuate Palestinian territory, writes Diana Buttu.

10. The left should recognise that equality is undesirable (Guardian)

Julian Glover suggests that a fair society may be one in which people have the right to strive for inequality.