Exit Rahm Emanuel. Enter "Mr Fixer"

Obama must do without the man he used to start and end his day with.

He was the tactician-in-chief who's had a hand in almost every aspect of Democratic politics at the highest level for the last four years. But now Rahm Emanuel is stepping down as White House chief of staff, as he returns to the rather different rough and tumble of big-city Chicago politics -- chasing what he's called his "dream job" as the city's next mayor.

Emanuel last held elected office back in 2002 -- when he represented Chicago's 5th district in Congress -- rising so rapidly he was chosen to head up the Democratic effort to recapture a majority in the House in 2006 which they managed, winning some 30 seats. But from the heady heights of chairing the House Democratic caucus, a complete gear change when Barack Obama offered him the job of chief of staff.

His style could hardly have been more of a contrast to his aloof, rather academic boss: this was a political street-fighter who was as well known for his profanity as his consumate strategic skills.He amassed a vast experience in political campaigns, from raising money to managing the team -- and from the start, he was integral to Obama's decision-making.

As White House press secretary Robert Gibbs said in Thursday's briefing: "The president starts his day with a meeting with Rahm and ends it with a meeting with Rahm. ...there's not an important thing that has happened in this administration that we've been able to accomplish for the American people that has not involved heavily his signature"

Of course Emanuel had plenty of political foes, inside the Democratic party and beyond: not least liberals who blame him for the decision to abandon the public option in the health care reforms, and forcing Democrats in the House to make key concessions to their Republican rivals. Because of him, they claim, any wider progressive vision was sacrificed to the pragmatic minutiae of political deals. In fact his relationship with House Democrats has not been particularly smooth: although Nancy Pelosi did announce yesterday that she would be endorsing his bid for Chicago mayor.

For the White House, it'll clearly be a huge loss with other key members of the Obama team set to announce their departures too, not least communications guru David Axelrod, who'll be taking charge of the 2012 re-election campaign.

It could leave the President somewhat bereft at this crucial moment in the presidency - or it could offer him a chance to reshape the West Wing, But the appointment of "Mr Fixer" Pete Rouse as acting chief of staff could send out a number of messages: he's clearly another insider, dubbed the "101st senator" -- with three decades of experience on Washington's political scene.

A profile in the New York Times described him as "a measured, discreet and skillful problem solver with a knack for navigating bureaucracy". All of which could come in handy if Obama finds himself having to deal with a Republican House.

It'll certainly be a quieter, politer West Wing - the cat-loving Rouse is also known for barely raising his voice - a man who fights his battles for the long term rather than any instant political gain. But beyond his interim tenure - there's a certain amount of pressure on Obama to find someone from outside his inner circle who could bring a new perspective and a different kind of energy to his team.

As for Rahm Emanuel he's now plunging into a rather crowded field back in Chicago with victory far from certain.

One city politician, Rep Bobby Rush, told the New York Times there would be no coronation: "He's a very viable and smart politician, but he's got as many challenges as everybody else."

So after today's high profile send off from President Obama, he'll be hitting the streets with a "listening tour" of city neighbourhoods trying to build a winning coalition before the primaries in Feburary next year. His spokesman, Rick Jasculca said the tour would be "very retail in its feel", trying to build "a one to one connection with people where they live and where they work." But he's already appointed political consultants (David Axelrod's old firm, as it happens) -- and there's a handy $1.2m left over from the campaign fund dating back to his Congressional days. He clearly knows how to run a successful campaign.

And a little of the old Obama magic, if he can find it, wouldn't go amiss either.

Felicity Spector is chief writer and American politics expert for Channel 4 News.

Photo: Getty
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In the fight against climate change, humanity has a choice of two futures

We must fight man-made climate change, says Patricia Scotland. 

So here we are at this fork in the road. On one path, the risk of a future of chaos. A new world map with miles and miles of stormy ocean where there were once islands and schools and playgrounds, businesses and life.

A globe with acre after acre of arid desert where there were once fertile mountains and valleys, green vegetation and food.

A path where our existence is defined by pandemics and migration crises, as the earth’s population tries to squeeze into the ever-reducing areas of habitable land.

In this reality, all the arguments about progress and advancement are consigned to the pages of our history, the only agenda item at international meetings is survival.

But the other fork is an alternative path. From the window of an airplane, with wings that exactly resemble a bird’s feathers, views of healthy mangrove as far as the eye can see, miles of luxurious, green canopy, interrupted by shimmering blue oceans.

Nature in all its glory and striking colours, thriving. And when it meets a city it doesn’t mind pausing for a while, because this metropolis is powered by geothermal energy, and the office buildings are made of carbon-eating concrete that behave like trees, and the mall is modelled after a termite mound. Every roof is lined with solar panels.

Two sides of the same coin. The first possibility a dystopian apocalyptic vision; the other a reality, already happening, which may just prevent and reverse the existential threat on this precious planet we call home. 

Last month, representatives of Commonwealth governments met with climate change experts, academics and businesses to launch an alternative pathway to addressing climate change, one that moves beyond adaptation, beyond mitigation, to actually reversing the human effects of climate change. 

It proposes to regenerate the environment by taking excess carbon and carbon dioxide (CO2) out of the atmosphere, where it is poisoning our planet, and putting it back in the soil where belongs.

This initiative, Regenerative Development to Reverse Climate Change, in collaboration with the Cloudburst Foundation, creates the potential for climate change to become an opportunity for innovation and sustainable, eco-friendly economic growth.

Strong support from some of the greatest environmental advocates, including Prince Charles, Mary Robinson and Anote Tong, and powerful presentations from some of the finest minds in the climate change arena, gave us the gift of possibility.

World-renowned experts like Paul Hawken, Thomas Goreau, Janine Benyus and Ben Haggard pointed out that these innovations are already happening. And it is quite simple really. For years man has watched nature and copied nature and nature has always led the way. How else did we make human flight happen if we did not copy God's own 'animal aircraft'?

We see it in other ways too, and the truth is that we already have amazing examples of biomimicry – technology that mimics nature. The eco-friendly Eastgate Centre in Zimbabwe is modelled after termite mounds. In China, the dry, barren plains of the Loess Plateau have been regenerated and restored to healthy green land; and we have similar examples of land regeneration in Rwanda.

What I am saying is that the genius of man, which created technologies that have huge benefits for human beings but detrimental effects on our environment, is the same genius we will employ to help us through mitigation and adaption, and ultimately to reverse climate change and stop global warming. But there is a fundamental problem. We have ecologists, scientists, environmentalists and academics coming up with these solutions working in silos.

So what the Commonwealth began to do last October, when we had our first climate change reversal workshop, is to bring them together. We invited 60 experts who are pioneering these approaches to climate change to Marlborough House. They explored how we can create an integrated plan on climate change reversal.

My goal is to be able to offer every Commonwealth country a package of multidisciplinary, multisectoral solutions to this multidimensional problem. Collaboration and political will are key, because we will need to weave the ideas into our curriculum, insert them in our building codes and business regulations and integrate them into our gender, agricultural and environmental policies.

But how will cash-strapped countries fund this? This is where initiatives like our Climate Finance Access Hub comes in. This programme gives countries the capacity to make successful applications for funding from the Green Fund and other climate change financing mechanisms.

We also have to listen to what the captains of industry are saying. At our meeting last month, Paul Polman, CEO of the mega-consumer goods company Unilever, stressed that when businesses consider investment they take into account sustainable development goals.

If there is no justice and peace, if there is hunger and destitution and if they are operating in cities which are not sustainable, on land that might be reclaimed by the sea or deteriorate into desert conditions, they are investing in a venture that will fail. So the regenerative approach does not have to come at the cost of economic growth. Actually, it will boost investment and development.

The Commonwealth has been at the forefront of the climate change discussion since the 1980s when it first became topical. Our milestones include the Langkawi Declaration in 1989 which commits us to protect the environment, and our leaders' summit in 2015, days before COP21, was instrumental in the landmark Paris Agreement on climate change. But the empirical evidence shows us that even at 1.5 degrees, islands will disappear into the ocean.

This November when governments convene at COP23, we will be posing the question: which pathway will you take? But this is not just a question for governments and organisations, it is a question for every single individual on this earth.

So what are we going to teach our children? More than 60 per cent of the 2.4 billion people in the Commonwealth are under the age of 30. How are we going to harness this exuberance and abundant talent and transform them into innovative solutions? How are we going to run our businesses and manage waste and energy in our homes? What path are you going to take? One that risks our future? Or one that is built on the principle that we can work with nature instead of against it to progress and develop?

Patricia Scotland is Secretary-General of the Commonwealth

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