CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. A U-turn that will wreck public trust (Independent)

The Liberal Democrats do not have a mandate to vote for a big rise in tuition fees, says Steve Richards.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

2. Three reasons why the cuts are doomed (Times) (£)

We do need to shrink the state in the long term, but the speed and style of Osborne's plans threaten the economy, warns Anatole Kaletsky.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

3. Britain's austerity apostles duck the debate (Financial Times)

Labour's promise to cut a little less than the coalition is not an alternative economic strategy, says Robert Skidelsky.

4. At long last our politicians have acquired the wisdom of humility (Daily Telegraph)

The 233 new MPs have enabled the return of a more straightfoward and honest politics, writes Benedict Brogan.

5. Tuition fees: securing a future for elitism (Guardian)

Lord Browne's proposals risk creating a two-tier system and ending the dream of university for many, says Carole Leathwood.

6. I resent this foolish housing minister (Daily Mail)

Grant Shapps is wrong to speak of home owners as the cause of the problem, argues Stephen Glover.

7. The Fed feels compelled to experiment (Financial Times)

A new programme of quantitative easing will have implications far beyond the US, writes Mohamed El-Erian.

8. In praise of ... prime minister's questions (Guardian)

The exchanges between Miliband and Cameron promise a return to reasoned debate, says a Guardian editorial.

9. Israel has no future as a purely Jewish state (Independent)

The push to make Israel into a mono-cultural nation makes peace negotiations impossible, says Adrian Hamilton.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

10. This Nobel prize was bold and right - but hits China's most sensitive nerve (Guardian)

We are right to honour China's dissidents but the west must not give up on dialogue, writes Timothy Garton Ash.

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Benn vs McDonnell: how Brexit has exposed the fight over Labour's party machine

In the wake of Brexit, should Labour MPs listen more closely to voters, or their own party members?

Two Labour MPs on primetime TV. Two prominent politicians ruling themselves out of a Labour leadership contest. But that was as far as the similarity went.

Hilary Benn was speaking hours after he resigned - or was sacked - from the Shadow Cabinet. He described Jeremy Corbyn as a "good and decent man" but not a leader.

Framing his overnight removal as a matter of conscience, Benn told the BBC's Andrew Marr: "I no longer have confidence in him [Corbyn] and I think the right thing to do would be for him to take that decision."

In Benn's view, diehard leftie pin ups do not go down well in the real world, or on the ballot papers of middle England. 

But while Benn may be drawing on a New Labour truism, this in turn rests on the assumption that voters matter more than the party members when it comes to winning elections.

That assumption was contested moments later by Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell.

Dismissive of the personal appeal of Shadow Cabinet ministers - "we can replace them" - McDonnell's message was that Labour under Corbyn had rejuvenated its electoral machine.

Pointing to success in by-elections and the London mayoral election, McDonnell warned would-be rebels: "Who is sovereign in our party? The people who are soverign are the party members. 

"I'm saying respect the party members. And in that way we can hold together and win the next election."

Indeed, nearly a year on from Corbyn's surprise election to the Labour leadership, it is worth remembering he captured nearly 60% of the 400,000 votes cast. Momentum, the grassroots organisation formed in the wake of his success, now has more than 50 branches around the country.

Come the next election, it will be these grassroots members who will knock on doors, hand out leaflets and perhaps even threaten to deselect MPs.

The question for wavering Labour MPs will be whether what they trust more - their own connection with voters, or this potentially unbiddable party machine.