Nick Clegg on the Lib Dem role in the Spending Review

Emphasises role of Lib Dem ministers in Spending Review, but denies that cuts aim to create a smalle

Nick Clegg has just sent out an email to Lib Dem members giving some of the rationale behind the Spending Review. It's very light on detail, but does provide a couple of interesting insights into how the Deputy Prime Minister is seeking to position his party politically going into this afternoon's announcement.

The core argument is, naturally, the same as the one offered by Cameron and Osborne – the outcome of the review is about fairness and, above all, cutting "Labour's deficit". But there are also certain phrases that demonstrate once again how tightly Clegg's fortunes are now tied to those of the coalition's leading Tory figures. The following paragraph is particularly interesting:

The spending review is a thoroughly Coalition product. Liberal Democrat ministers have been involved every step of the way. Our values and priorities are written through the review, like the message in a stick of rock.

As my colleagues Mehdi Hasan and James Macintyre pointed out in the run-up to the Lib Dem conference, the spending review is just the first in a series of tests for the Lib Dems as a party of government, perhaps the most significant being the local elections to come next May. But with the polling numbers long suggesting we can expect a big swell of unpopularity for this afternoon's announcement, the Spending Review isn't without its challenges for the Lib Dems. Members, and a fair number of Lib Dem MPs, will be feeling very uncomfortable this afternoon.

However, the key paragraph of the letter comes at the end, where Clegg lays out his version of the motivation behind the cuts:

We are not taking the decisions today because they are easy or because we want to see a smaller state, we are taking them because they are right.

He said something similar in his conference speech – it's clearly a line designed for the membership, many of whom will be feeling uneasy about the Tories' mantra of "smaller state, bigger society". Now that Clegg has positioned his party and his ministers so centrally to the Spending Review, it will be fascinating to see how his backbenchers choose to respond, come the inevitable fallout.

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman.

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PMQs review: Theresa May shows again that Brexit means hard Brexit

The Prime Minister's promise of "an end to free movement" is incompatible with single market membership. 

Theresa May, it is commonly said, has told us nothing about Brexit. At today's PMQs, Jeremy Corbyn ran with this line, demanding that May offer "some clarity". In response, as she has before, May stated what has become her defining aim: "an end to free movement". This vow makes a "hard Brexit" (or "chaotic Brexit" as Corbyn called it) all but inevitable. The EU regards the "four freedoms" (goods, capital, services and people) as indivisible and will not grant the UK an exemption. The risk of empowering eurosceptics elsewhere is too great. Only at the cost of leaving the single market will the UK regain control of immigration.

May sought to open up a dividing line by declaring that "the Labour Party wants to continue with free movement" (it has refused to rule out its continuation). "I want to deliver on the will of the British people, he is trying to frustrate the British people," she said. The problem is determining what the people's will is. Though polls show voters want control of free movement, they also show they want to maintain single market membership. It is not only Boris Johnson who is pro-having cake and pro-eating it. 

Corbyn later revealed that he had been "consulting the great philosophers" as to the meaning of Brexit (a possible explanation for the non-mention of Heathrow, Zac Goldsmith's resignation and May's Goldman Sachs speech). "All I can come up with is Baldrick, who says our cunning plan is to have no plan," he quipped. Without missing a beat, May replied: "I'm interested that [he] chose Baldrick, of course the actor playing Baldrick was a member of the Labour Party, as I recall." (Tony Robinson, a Corbyn critic ("crap leader"), later tweeted that he still is one). "We're going to deliver the best possible deal in goods and services and we're going to deliver an end to free movement," May continued. The problem for her is that the latter aim means that the "best possible deal" may be a long way from the best. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.