Shadow cabinet election results in full

Yvette Cooper tops ballot. Peter Hain, Ben Bradshaw and Diane Abbott all miss out.

We weren't expecting the shadow cabinet election results until 9pm, but Labour MP Barry Gardiner has just leaked them on Twitter. Below are the 19 MPs who have made the cut.

Notable casualties include former cabinet ministers Peter Hain, Ben Bradshaw, Shaun Woodward and Stephen Timms, as well as Diane Abbott, David Lammy and Stephen Twigg. Hain, who was a key Ed Miliband supporter, will be particularly disappointed not to have been elected. But Diane Abbott's failure comes as no surprise. The right loath her socialist politics and the left haven't forgiven her decision to send her son to private school. Elsewhere, Tessa Jowell, one of the few remaining Blairite ultras, will be pleased with her performance.

As widely predicted, Yvette Cooper topped the poll with 232 votes, putting her in pole position for the shadow chancellorship. In total, the shadow cabinet contains 11 women (out of 25), not far off Harriet Harman's original target of a 50:50 split.

1. Yvette Cooper: 232 votes

2. John Healey: 192 votes

3. Ed Balls: 179 votes

4. Andy Burnham: 165 votes

5. Angela Eagle: 165 votes

6. Alan Johnson: 165 votes

7. Douglas Alexander: 160 votes

8. Jim Murphy: 160 votes

9. Tessa Jowell: 152 votes

10. Caroline Flint: 139 votes

11. John Denham: 129 votes

12. Hilary Benn: 128 votes

13. Sadiq Khan: 128 votes

14. Mary Creagh: 119 votes

15. Ann McKechin: 117 votes

16. Maria Eagle: 107 votes

17. Meg Hillier: 106 votes

18. Ivan Lewis: 104 votes

19. Liam Byrne: 100 votes

They join the following Labour MPs and Peers who are already members of the shadow cabinet:

Ed Miliband, Leader
Harriet Harman, Deputy Leader
Tony Lloyd , Chair of the Parliamentary Labour Party
Rosie Winterton, Shadow Chief Whip
Baroness Jan Royall, Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
Lord Steve Bassam, Chief Whip in the House of Lords

The Defeated

Emily Thornberry: 99 votes

Peter Hain: 97 votes

Fiona MacTaggart: 88 votes

Barbara Keeley: 87 votes

Vernon Coaker: 85 votes

Patrick McFadden: 84 votes

Helen Goodman: 80 votes

David Lammy: 80 votes

Stephen Timms: 79 votes

Chris Bryant: 77 votes

Shaun Woodward: 72 votes

Gareth Thomas: 71 votes

Kevin Brennan: 64 votes

Roberta Blackman-Woods: 63 votes

Diane Abbott: 59 votes

Stephen Twigg: 55 votes

Tom Harris: 54 votes

Ben Bradshaw: 53 votes

Iain Wright: 43 votes

Barry Gardiner: 41 votes

David Hanson: 38 votes

Ian Lucas: 34 votes

Wayne David 30 votes

Huw Irranca-Davies 28 votes

Chris Leslie: 26 votes

Rob Flello: 15 votes

Mike Gapes: 12 votes

Alun Michael: 11 votes

Eric Joyce: 10 votes

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Harriet Harman warns that the Brexit debate has been dominated by men

The former deputy leader hit out at the marginalisation of women's voices in the EU referendum campaign.

The EU referendum campaign has been dominated by men, Labour’s former deputy leader Harriet Harman warns today. The veteran MP, who was acting Labour leader between May and September last year, said that the absence of female voices in the debate has meant that arguments about the ramifications of Brexit for British women have not been heard.

Harman has written to Sharon White, the Chief of Executive of Ofcom, expressing her “serious concern that the referendum campaign has to date been dominated by men.” She says: “Half the population of this country are women and our membership of the EU is important to women’s lives. Yet men are – as usual – pushing women out.”

Research by Labour has revealed that since the start of this year, just 10 women politicians have appeared on the BBC’s Today programme to discuss the referendum, compared to 48 men. On BBC Breakfast over the same time period, there have been 12 male politicians interviewed on the subject compared to only 2 women. On ITV’s Good Morning Britain, 18 men and 6 women have talked about the referendum.

In her letter, Harman says that the dearth of women “fails to reflect the breadth of voices involved with the campaign and as a consequence, a narrow range [of] issues ends up being discussed, leaving many women feeling shut out of the national debate.”

Harman calls on Ofcom “to do what it can amongst broadcasters to help ensure women are properly represented on broadcast media and that serious issues affecting female voters are given adequate media coverage.” 

She says: "women are being excluded and the debate narrowed.  The broadcasters have to keep a balance between those who want remain and those who want to leave. They should have a balance between men and women." 

A report published by Loughborough University yesterday found that women have been “significantly marginalised” in reporting of the referendum, with just 16 per cent of TV appearances on the subject being by women. Additionally, none of the ten individuals who have received the most press coverage on the topic is a woman.

Harman's intervention comes amidst increasing concerns that many if not all of the new “metro mayors” elected from next year will be men. Despite Greater Manchester having an equal number of male and female Labour MPs, the current candidates for the Labour nomination for the new Manchester mayoralty are all men. Luciana Berger, the Shadow Minister for mental health, is reportedly considering running to be Labour’s candidate for mayor of the Liverpool city region, but will face strong competition from incumbent mayor Joe Anderson and fellow MP Steve Rotheram.

Last week, Harriet Harman tweeted her hope that some of the new mayors would be women.  

Henry Zeffman writes about politics and is the winner of the Anthony Howard Award 2015.