Shadow cabinet election results in full

Yvette Cooper tops ballot. Peter Hain, Ben Bradshaw and Diane Abbott all miss out.

We weren't expecting the shadow cabinet election results until 9pm, but Labour MP Barry Gardiner has just leaked them on Twitter. Below are the 19 MPs who have made the cut.

Notable casualties include former cabinet ministers Peter Hain, Ben Bradshaw, Shaun Woodward and Stephen Timms, as well as Diane Abbott, David Lammy and Stephen Twigg. Hain, who was a key Ed Miliband supporter, will be particularly disappointed not to have been elected. But Diane Abbott's failure comes as no surprise. The right loath her socialist politics and the left haven't forgiven her decision to send her son to private school. Elsewhere, Tessa Jowell, one of the few remaining Blairite ultras, will be pleased with her performance.

As widely predicted, Yvette Cooper topped the poll with 232 votes, putting her in pole position for the shadow chancellorship. In total, the shadow cabinet contains 11 women (out of 25), not far off Harriet Harman's original target of a 50:50 split.

1. Yvette Cooper: 232 votes

2. John Healey: 192 votes

3. Ed Balls: 179 votes

4. Andy Burnham: 165 votes

5. Angela Eagle: 165 votes

6. Alan Johnson: 165 votes

7. Douglas Alexander: 160 votes

8. Jim Murphy: 160 votes

9. Tessa Jowell: 152 votes

10. Caroline Flint: 139 votes

11. John Denham: 129 votes

12. Hilary Benn: 128 votes

13. Sadiq Khan: 128 votes

14. Mary Creagh: 119 votes

15. Ann McKechin: 117 votes

16. Maria Eagle: 107 votes

17. Meg Hillier: 106 votes

18. Ivan Lewis: 104 votes

19. Liam Byrne: 100 votes

They join the following Labour MPs and Peers who are already members of the shadow cabinet:

Ed Miliband, Leader
Harriet Harman, Deputy Leader
Tony Lloyd , Chair of the Parliamentary Labour Party
Rosie Winterton, Shadow Chief Whip
Baroness Jan Royall, Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
Lord Steve Bassam, Chief Whip in the House of Lords

The Defeated

Emily Thornberry: 99 votes

Peter Hain: 97 votes

Fiona MacTaggart: 88 votes

Barbara Keeley: 87 votes

Vernon Coaker: 85 votes

Patrick McFadden: 84 votes

Helen Goodman: 80 votes

David Lammy: 80 votes

Stephen Timms: 79 votes

Chris Bryant: 77 votes

Shaun Woodward: 72 votes

Gareth Thomas: 71 votes

Kevin Brennan: 64 votes

Roberta Blackman-Woods: 63 votes

Diane Abbott: 59 votes

Stephen Twigg: 55 votes

Tom Harris: 54 votes

Ben Bradshaw: 53 votes

Iain Wright: 43 votes

Barry Gardiner: 41 votes

David Hanson: 38 votes

Ian Lucas: 34 votes

Wayne David 30 votes

Huw Irranca-Davies 28 votes

Chris Leslie: 26 votes

Rob Flello: 15 votes

Mike Gapes: 12 votes

Alun Michael: 11 votes

Eric Joyce: 10 votes

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.