Shadow cabinet election results in full

Yvette Cooper tops ballot. Peter Hain, Ben Bradshaw and Diane Abbott all miss out.

We weren't expecting the shadow cabinet election results until 9pm, but Labour MP Barry Gardiner has just leaked them on Twitter. Below are the 19 MPs who have made the cut.

Notable casualties include former cabinet ministers Peter Hain, Ben Bradshaw, Shaun Woodward and Stephen Timms, as well as Diane Abbott, David Lammy and Stephen Twigg. Hain, who was a key Ed Miliband supporter, will be particularly disappointed not to have been elected. But Diane Abbott's failure comes as no surprise. The right loath her socialist politics and the left haven't forgiven her decision to send her son to private school. Elsewhere, Tessa Jowell, one of the few remaining Blairite ultras, will be pleased with her performance.

As widely predicted, Yvette Cooper topped the poll with 232 votes, putting her in pole position for the shadow chancellorship. In total, the shadow cabinet contains 11 women (out of 25), not far off Harriet Harman's original target of a 50:50 split.

1. Yvette Cooper: 232 votes

2. John Healey: 192 votes

3. Ed Balls: 179 votes

4. Andy Burnham: 165 votes

5. Angela Eagle: 165 votes

6. Alan Johnson: 165 votes

7. Douglas Alexander: 160 votes

8. Jim Murphy: 160 votes

9. Tessa Jowell: 152 votes

10. Caroline Flint: 139 votes

11. John Denham: 129 votes

12. Hilary Benn: 128 votes

13. Sadiq Khan: 128 votes

14. Mary Creagh: 119 votes

15. Ann McKechin: 117 votes

16. Maria Eagle: 107 votes

17. Meg Hillier: 106 votes

18. Ivan Lewis: 104 votes

19. Liam Byrne: 100 votes

They join the following Labour MPs and Peers who are already members of the shadow cabinet:

Ed Miliband, Leader
Harriet Harman, Deputy Leader
Tony Lloyd , Chair of the Parliamentary Labour Party
Rosie Winterton, Shadow Chief Whip
Baroness Jan Royall, Shadow Leader of the House of Lords
Lord Steve Bassam, Chief Whip in the House of Lords

The Defeated

Emily Thornberry: 99 votes

Peter Hain: 97 votes

Fiona MacTaggart: 88 votes

Barbara Keeley: 87 votes

Vernon Coaker: 85 votes

Patrick McFadden: 84 votes

Helen Goodman: 80 votes

David Lammy: 80 votes

Stephen Timms: 79 votes

Chris Bryant: 77 votes

Shaun Woodward: 72 votes

Gareth Thomas: 71 votes

Kevin Brennan: 64 votes

Roberta Blackman-Woods: 63 votes

Diane Abbott: 59 votes

Stephen Twigg: 55 votes

Tom Harris: 54 votes

Ben Bradshaw: 53 votes

Iain Wright: 43 votes

Barry Gardiner: 41 votes

David Hanson: 38 votes

Ian Lucas: 34 votes

Wayne David 30 votes

Huw Irranca-Davies 28 votes

Chris Leslie: 26 votes

Rob Flello: 15 votes

Mike Gapes: 12 votes

Alun Michael: 11 votes

Eric Joyce: 10 votes

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Theresa May's offer to EU citizens leaves the 3 million with unanswered questions

So many EU citizens, so little time.

Ahead of the Brexit negotiations with the 27 remaining EU countries, the UK government has just published its pledges to EU citizens living in the UK, listing the rights it will guarantee them after Brexit and how it will guarantee them. The headline: all 3 million of the country’s EU citizens will have to apply to a special “settled status” ID card to remain in the UK after it exist the European Union.

After having spent a year in limbo, and in various occasions having been treated by the same UK government as bargaining chips, this offer will leave many EU citizens living in the UK (this journalist included) with more questions than answers.

Indisputably, this is a step forward. But in June 2017 – more than a year since the EU referendum – it is all too little, too late. 

“EU citizens are valued members of their communities here, and we know that UK nationals abroad are viewed in the same way by their host countries.”

These are words the UK’s EU citizens needed to hear a year ago, when they woke up in a country that had just voted Leave, after a referendum campaign that every week felt more focused on immigration.

“EU citizens who came to the UK before the EU Referendum, and before the formal Article 50 process for exiting the EU was triggered, came on the basis that they would be able to settle permanently, if they were able to build a life here. We recognise the need to honour that expectation.”

A year later, after the UK’s Europeans have experienced rising abuse and hate crime, many have left as a result and the ones who chose to stay and apply for permanent residency have seen their applications returned with a letter asking them to “prepare to leave the country”, these words seem dubious at best.

To any EU citizen whose life has been suspended for the past year, this is the very least the British government could offer. It would have sounded a much more sincere offer a year ago.

And it almost happened then: an editorial in the Evening Standard reported last week that Theresa May, then David Cameron’s home secretary, was the reason it didn’t. “Last June, in the days immediately after the referendum, David Cameron wanted to reassure EU citizens they would be allowed to stay,” the editorial reads. “All his Cabinet agreed with that unilateral offer, except his Home Secretary, Mrs May, who insisted on blocking it.” 

"They will need to apply to the Home Office for permission to stay, which will be evidenced through a residence document. This will be a legal requirement but there is also an important practical reason for this. The residence document will enable EU citizens (and their families) living in the UK to demonstrate to third parties (such as employers or providers of public services) that they have permission to continue to live and work legally in the UK."

The government’s offer lacks details in the measures it introduces – namely, how it will implement the registration and allocation of a special ID card for 3 million individuals. This “residence document” will be “a legal requirement” and will “demonstrate to third parties” that EU citizens have “permission to continue to live and work legally in the UK.” It will grant individuals ““settled status” in UK law (indefinite leave to remain pursuant to the Immigration Act 1971)”.

The government has no reliable figure for the EU citizens living in the UK (3 million is an estimation). Even “modernised and kept as smooth as possible”, the administrative procedure may take a while. The Migration Observatory puts the figure at 140 years assuming current procedures are followed; let’s be optimistic and divide by 10, thanks to modernisation. That’s still 14 years, which is an awful lot.

To qualify to receive the settled status, an individual must have been resident in the UK for five years before a specified (although unspecified by the government at this time) date. Those who have not been a continuous UK resident for that long will have to apply for temporary status until they have reached the five years figure, to become eligible to apply for settled status.

That’s an application to be temporarily eligible to apply to be allowed to stay in the UK. Both applications for which the lengths of procedure remain unknown.

Will EU citizens awaiting for their temporary status be able to leave the country before they are registered? Before they have been here five years? How individuals will prove their continuous employment or housing is undisclosed – what about people working freelance? Lodgers? Will proof of housing or employment be enough, or will both be needed?

Among the many other practicalities the government’s offer does not detail is the cost of such a scheme, although it promises to “set fees at a reasonable level” – which means it will definitely not be free to be an EU citizen in the UK (before Brexit, it definitely was.)

And the new ID will replace any previous status held by EU citizens, which means even holders of permanent citizenship will have to reapply.

Remember that 140 years figure? Doesn’t sound so crazy now, does it?

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