Shadow cabinet: junior appointments in full

Junior jobs for many of the shadow cabinet election losers, as well as some of the new intake.

Ed Miliband's office has now announced the full raft of shadow cabinet appointments, including junior roles. You can see the list of top jobs here, but see below for the full list of junior appointments.

Few surprises on the whole; from the new intake, NS tips for the future Chuka Ummana, Rushanara Ali, Gloria De Piero, Michael Dugher and Rachel Reeves have all taken their first steps towards future front bench careers, while those who missed out in the shadow cabinet election itself have also made a showing, with erstwhile leadership candidate Diane Abbott taking on public health, Emily Thornberry (who missed out on the top tier by one vote) also joining the health team, and Fiona MacTaggart, who also came close, to work with Yvette Cooper on equality.

Of the former ministers who missed out, David Lammy and Ben Bradshaw have not taken junior jobs (although they will almost certainly have been offered them). The other point of note is the appointment of Phil Woolas, MP for Oldham East and Saddleworth, to the shadow home office team. Woolas is currently fighting an attempt to overturn his election victory in court for alleged "corrupt practices". Depending on the verdict of the case (expected later this month), his appointment could come back to haunt Ed Miliband as his team begin to get down to the work of opposition.

Here's the full list by department (shadow minister in bold):

Leader of the Opposition

Rt Hon Ed Miliband MP

PPS to the Leader of the Opposition: Anne McGuire MP
PPS to the Leader of the Opposition: Chuka Umunna MP

Department for International Development

Deputy Leader and Shadow Secretary of State for International Development: Rt Hon Harriet Harman MP

Mark Lazarowicz MP
Rushanara Ali MP

HM Treasury

Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer: Rt Hon Alan Johnson MP

Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury: Angela Eagle MP

David Hanson MP
Chris Leslie MP
Kerry McCarthy MP

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Shadow Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and Shadow Minister for Women and Equalities: Rt Hon Yvette Cooper MP

Rt Hon John Spellar MP
Wayne David MP
Stephen Twigg MP
Emma Reynolds MP

Government Equalities Office

Shadow Minister for Women and Equalities: Rt Hon Yvette Cooper MP

Fiona MacTaggart MP

Home Office

Shadow Secretary of State for the Home Department: Rt Hon Ed Balls MP

Vernon Coaker MP
Phil Woolas MP
Gerry Sutcliffe MP
Diana Johnson MP
Shabana Mahmood MP

Department for Education

Shadow Secretary of State for Education and Election Coordinator: Rt Hon Andy Burnham MP

Kevin Brennan MP
Sharon Hodgson MP
Iain Wright MP
Toby Perkins MP

Ministry of Justice

Shadow Lord Chancellor, Shadow Secretary of State for Justice (with responsibility for political and constitutional reform): Rt Hon Sadiq Khan MP

Shadow Minister (Political and Constitutional Reform): Chris Bryant MP

Helen Goodman MP
Andy Slaughter MP
Rob Flello MP

Department for Work and Pensions

Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions: Rt Hon Douglas Alexander MP

Stephen Timms MP
Karen Buck MP
Margaret Curran MP
Rachel Reeves MP

Department for Business, Innovation and Skills

Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills: Rt Hon John Denham MP

Gareth Thomas MP
Ian Lucas MP
Gordon Banks MP
Gordon Marsden MP
Nia Griffith MP
Chi Onwurah MP

Department of Health

Shadow Secretary of State for Health: Rt Hon John Healey MP

Shadow Minister (Public Health): Diane Abbott MP

Emily Thornberry MP
Derek Twigg MP
Liz Kendall MP

Department for Communities and Local Government

Shadow Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government: Rt Hon Caroline Flint MP

Alison Seabeck MP
Barbara Keeley MP
Jack Dromey MP
Chris Williamson MP

Ministry of Defence

Shadow Secretary of State for Defence: Rt Hon Jim Murphy MP

Kevan Jones MP
Russell Brown MP
Michael Dugher MP
Gemma Doyle MP

Department for Energy and Climate Change

Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change: Meg Hillier MP

Huw Irranca-Davies
Luciana Berger MP

Office of the Leader of the House of Commons

Shadow Leader of the House of Commons: Rt Hon Hilary Benn MP

Shadow Deputy Leader of the House of Commons: Helen Jones MP

Department for Transport

Shadow Secretary of State for Transport: Maria Eagle MP

Jim Fitzpatrick MP
Andrew Gwynne MP
John Woodcock MP

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Mary Creagh MP

Willie Bain MP
Jamie Reed MP
Peter Soulsby MP

Northern Ireland

Shadow Secretary of State for Northern Ireland: Rt Hon Shaun Woodward MP

Eric Joyce MP

Scotland Office

Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland: Ann McKechin MP

Tom Greatrex MP

Wales

Shadow Secretary of State for Wales: Rt Hon Peter Hain MP

Owen Smith MP

Culture, Media and Sport

Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport: Ivan Lewis MP

Shadow Minister for the Olympics: Rt Hon Tessa Jowell MP

Ian Austin MP
Gloria De Piero MP

Shadow Leader of the House of Lords

Shadow Leader of the House of Lords: Rt Hon Baroness Royall of Blaisdon

Cabinet office

Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office: Rt Hon Liam Byrne MP

Shadow Minister of State - Cabinet Office: Jon Trickett MP

Roberta Blackman-Woods MP

Law Officers

Shadow Attorney-General: Rt Hon Baroness Scotland

Shadow Solicitor-General: Catherine McKinnell MP

Whips Office (Commons)

Opposition Chief Whip: Rt Hon Rosie Winterton MP

Deputy Chief Whip: Alan Campbell MP

Pairing Whip: Tony Cunningham MP

Whip: Lyn Brown MP

Whip: Mark Tami MP

Whip: David Wright MP

Assistant Whip: Stephen Pound MP

Assistant Whip: David Hamilton MP

Assistant Whip: Dave Anderson MP

Assistant Whip: Angela C Smith MP

Assistant Whip: Phil Wilson MP

Assistant Whip: Lillian Greenwood MP

Assistant Whip: Jonathan Reynolds MP

Assistant Whip: Graham Jones MP

Whips Office (Lords)

Lords Chief Whip: Rt Hon Lord Bassam of Brighton

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman.

Screengrab from Telegraph video
Show Hide image

The Telegraph’s bizarre list of 100 reasons to be happy about Brexit

“Old-fashioned light bulbs”, “crooked cucumbers”, and “new vocabulary”.

As the economy teeters on the verge of oblivion, and the Prime Minister grapples with steering the UK around a black hole of political turmoil, the Telegraph is making the best of a bad situation.

The paper has posted a video labelled “100 reasons to embrace Brexit”. Obviously the precise number is “zero”, but that didn’t stop it filling the blanks with some rather bizarre reasons, floating before the viewer to an inevitable Jerusalem soundtrack:

Cheap tennis balls

At last. Tennis balls are no longer reserved for the gilded eurocrat elite.

Keep paper licences

I can’t trust it unless I can get it wet so it disintegrates, or I can throw it in the bin by mistake, or lose it when I’m clearing out my filing cabinet. It’s only authentic that way.

New hangover cures

What?

Stronger vacuums

An end to the miserable years of desperately trying to hoover up dust by inhaling close to the carpet.

Old-fashioned light bulbs

I like my electricals filled with mercury and coated in lead paint, ideally.

No more EU elections

Because the democratic aspect of the European Union was something we never obsessed over in the run-up to the referendum.

End working time directive

At last, I don’t even have to go to the trouble of opting out of over-working! I will automatically be exploited!

Drop green targets

Most people don’t have time to worry about the future of our planet. Some don’t even know where their next tennis ball will come from.

No more wind farms

Renewable energy sources, infrastructure and investment – what a bore.

Blue passports

I like my personal identification how I like my rinse.

UK passport lane

Oh good, an unadulterated queue of British tourists. Just mind the vomit, beer spillage and flakes of sunburnt skin while you wait.

No fridge red tape

Free the fridge!

Pounds and ounces

Units of measurement are definitely top of voters’ priorities. Way above the economy, health service, and even a smidgen higher than equality of tennis ball access.

Straight bananas

Wait, what kind of bananas do Brexiteers want? Didn’t they want to protect bendy ones? Either way, this is as persistent a myth as the slapstick banana skin trope.

Crooked cucumbers

I don’t understand.

Small kiwi fruits

Fair enough. They were getting a bit above their station, weren’t they.

No EU flags in UK

They are a disgusting colour and design. An eyesore everywhere you look…in the uh zero places that fly them here.

Kent champagne

To celebrate Ukip cleaning up the east coast, right?

No olive oil bans

Finally, we can put our reliable, Mediterranean weather and multiple olive groves to proper use.

No clinical trials red tape

What is there to regulate?

No Turkey EU worries

True, we don’t have to worry. Because there is NO WAY AND NEVER WAS.

No kettle restrictions

Free the kettle! All kitchen appliances’ lives matter!

Less EU X-factor

What is this?

Ditto with BGT

I really don’t get this.

New vocabulary

Mainly racist slurs, right?

Keep our UN seat

Until that in/out UN referendum, of course.

No EU human rights laws

Yeah, got a bit fed up with my human rights tbh.

Herbal remedy boost

At last, a chance to be treated with medicine that doesn’t work.

Others will follow [picture of dominos]

Hooray! The economic collapse of countries surrounding us upon whose trade and labour we rely, one by one!

Better English team

Ah, because we can replace them with more qualified players under an Australian-style points-based system, you mean?

High-powered hairdryers

An end to the miserable years of desperately trying to dry my hair by yawning on it.

She would’ve wanted it [picture of Margaret Thatcher]

Well, I’m convinced.

I'm a mole, innit.