Shadow cabinet: junior appointments in full

Junior jobs for many of the shadow cabinet election losers, as well as some of the new intake.

Ed Miliband's office has now announced the full raft of shadow cabinet appointments, including junior roles. You can see the list of top jobs here, but see below for the full list of junior appointments.

Few surprises on the whole; from the new intake, NS tips for the future Chuka Ummana, Rushanara Ali, Gloria De Piero, Michael Dugher and Rachel Reeves have all taken their first steps towards future front bench careers, while those who missed out in the shadow cabinet election itself have also made a showing, with erstwhile leadership candidate Diane Abbott taking on public health, Emily Thornberry (who missed out on the top tier by one vote) also joining the health team, and Fiona MacTaggart, who also came close, to work with Yvette Cooper on equality.

Of the former ministers who missed out, David Lammy and Ben Bradshaw have not taken junior jobs (although they will almost certainly have been offered them). The other point of note is the appointment of Phil Woolas, MP for Oldham East and Saddleworth, to the shadow home office team. Woolas is currently fighting an attempt to overturn his election victory in court for alleged "corrupt practices". Depending on the verdict of the case (expected later this month), his appointment could come back to haunt Ed Miliband as his team begin to get down to the work of opposition.

Here's the full list by department (shadow minister in bold):

Leader of the Opposition

Rt Hon Ed Miliband MP

PPS to the Leader of the Opposition: Anne McGuire MP
PPS to the Leader of the Opposition: Chuka Umunna MP

Department for International Development

Deputy Leader and Shadow Secretary of State for International Development: Rt Hon Harriet Harman MP

Mark Lazarowicz MP
Rushanara Ali MP

HM Treasury

Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer: Rt Hon Alan Johnson MP

Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury: Angela Eagle MP

David Hanson MP
Chris Leslie MP
Kerry McCarthy MP

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Shadow Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and Shadow Minister for Women and Equalities: Rt Hon Yvette Cooper MP

Rt Hon John Spellar MP
Wayne David MP
Stephen Twigg MP
Emma Reynolds MP

Government Equalities Office

Shadow Minister for Women and Equalities: Rt Hon Yvette Cooper MP

Fiona MacTaggart MP

Home Office

Shadow Secretary of State for the Home Department: Rt Hon Ed Balls MP

Vernon Coaker MP
Phil Woolas MP
Gerry Sutcliffe MP
Diana Johnson MP
Shabana Mahmood MP

Department for Education

Shadow Secretary of State for Education and Election Coordinator: Rt Hon Andy Burnham MP

Kevin Brennan MP
Sharon Hodgson MP
Iain Wright MP
Toby Perkins MP

Ministry of Justice

Shadow Lord Chancellor, Shadow Secretary of State for Justice (with responsibility for political and constitutional reform): Rt Hon Sadiq Khan MP

Shadow Minister (Political and Constitutional Reform): Chris Bryant MP

Helen Goodman MP
Andy Slaughter MP
Rob Flello MP

Department for Work and Pensions

Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions: Rt Hon Douglas Alexander MP

Stephen Timms MP
Karen Buck MP
Margaret Curran MP
Rachel Reeves MP

Department for Business, Innovation and Skills

Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills: Rt Hon John Denham MP

Gareth Thomas MP
Ian Lucas MP
Gordon Banks MP
Gordon Marsden MP
Nia Griffith MP
Chi Onwurah MP

Department of Health

Shadow Secretary of State for Health: Rt Hon John Healey MP

Shadow Minister (Public Health): Diane Abbott MP

Emily Thornberry MP
Derek Twigg MP
Liz Kendall MP

Department for Communities and Local Government

Shadow Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government: Rt Hon Caroline Flint MP

Alison Seabeck MP
Barbara Keeley MP
Jack Dromey MP
Chris Williamson MP

Ministry of Defence

Shadow Secretary of State for Defence: Rt Hon Jim Murphy MP

Kevan Jones MP
Russell Brown MP
Michael Dugher MP
Gemma Doyle MP

Department for Energy and Climate Change

Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change: Meg Hillier MP

Huw Irranca-Davies
Luciana Berger MP

Office of the Leader of the House of Commons

Shadow Leader of the House of Commons: Rt Hon Hilary Benn MP

Shadow Deputy Leader of the House of Commons: Helen Jones MP

Department for Transport

Shadow Secretary of State for Transport: Maria Eagle MP

Jim Fitzpatrick MP
Andrew Gwynne MP
John Woodcock MP

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Mary Creagh MP

Willie Bain MP
Jamie Reed MP
Peter Soulsby MP

Northern Ireland

Shadow Secretary of State for Northern Ireland: Rt Hon Shaun Woodward MP

Eric Joyce MP

Scotland Office

Shadow Secretary of State for Scotland: Ann McKechin MP

Tom Greatrex MP

Wales

Shadow Secretary of State for Wales: Rt Hon Peter Hain MP

Owen Smith MP

Culture, Media and Sport

Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport: Ivan Lewis MP

Shadow Minister for the Olympics: Rt Hon Tessa Jowell MP

Ian Austin MP
Gloria De Piero MP

Shadow Leader of the House of Lords

Shadow Leader of the House of Lords: Rt Hon Baroness Royall of Blaisdon

Cabinet office

Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office: Rt Hon Liam Byrne MP

Shadow Minister of State - Cabinet Office: Jon Trickett MP

Roberta Blackman-Woods MP

Law Officers

Shadow Attorney-General: Rt Hon Baroness Scotland

Shadow Solicitor-General: Catherine McKinnell MP

Whips Office (Commons)

Opposition Chief Whip: Rt Hon Rosie Winterton MP

Deputy Chief Whip: Alan Campbell MP

Pairing Whip: Tony Cunningham MP

Whip: Lyn Brown MP

Whip: Mark Tami MP

Whip: David Wright MP

Assistant Whip: Stephen Pound MP

Assistant Whip: David Hamilton MP

Assistant Whip: Dave Anderson MP

Assistant Whip: Angela C Smith MP

Assistant Whip: Phil Wilson MP

Assistant Whip: Lillian Greenwood MP

Assistant Whip: Jonathan Reynolds MP

Assistant Whip: Graham Jones MP

Whips Office (Lords)

Lords Chief Whip: Rt Hon Lord Bassam of Brighton

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.

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What Donald Trump could learn from Ronald Reagan

Reagan’s candidacy was built on more than his celebrity. Trump not only lacks experience as an elected official, he isn’t part of any organised political movement.

“No one remembers who came in second.” That wisdom, frequently dispensed by the US presidential candidate Donald Trump, came back to haunt him this week. Trump’s loss in the Iowa Republican caucuses to the Texas senator Ted Cruz, barely beating Senator Marco Rubio of Florida for second place, was the first crack in a campaign that has defied all expectations.

It has been a campaign built on Trump’s celebrity. Over the past eight months, his broad name recognition, larger-than-life personality and media savvy have produced a theatrical candidacy that has transfixed even those he repels. The question now is whether that celebrity will be enough – whether a man so obsessed with being “Number One” can bounce back from defeat.

Iowa isn’t everything, after all. It didn’t back the eventual Republican nominee in 2008 or 2012. Nor, for that matter, in 1980, when another “celebrity” candidate was in the mix. That was the year Iowa picked George H W Bush over Ronald Reagan – the former actor whom seasoned journalists dismissed as much for his right-wing views as for his “B-movie” repertoire. But Reagan regrouped, romped to victory in the New Hampshire primary and rode a wave of popular support all the way to the White House.

Trump might hope to replicate that success and has made a point of pushing the Reagan analogy more generally. Yet it is a comparison that exposes Trump’s weaknesses and his strengths.

Both men were once Democrats who came later in life to the Republican Party, projecting toughness, certainty and unabashed patriotism. Trump has even adopted Reagan’s 1980 campaign promise to “make America great again”. Like Reagan, he has shown he can appeal to evangelicals despite question marks over his religious conviction and divorces. In his ability to deflect criticism, too, Trump has shown himself as adept as Reagan – if by defiance rather than by charm – and redefined what it means to be “Teflon” in the age of Twitter.

That defiance, however, points to a huge difference in tone between Reagan’s candidacy and Trump’s. Reagan’s vision was a positive, optimistic one, even as he castigated “big government” and the perceived decline of US power. Reagan’s America was meant to be “a city upon a hill” offering a shining example of liberty to the world – in rhetoric at least. Trump’s vision is of an America closed off from the world. His rhetoric invokes fear as often as it does freedom.

On a personal level, Reagan avoided the vituperative attacks that have been the hallmark of Trump’s campaign, even as he took on the then“establishment” of the Republican Party – a moderate, urban, east coast elite. In his first run for the nomination, in 1976, Reagan even challenged an incumbent Republican president, Gerald Ford, and came close to defeating him. But he mounted the challenge on policy grounds, advocating the so-called “Eleventh Commandment”: “Thou shalt not speak ill of any fellow Republican.” Trump, as the TV debates between the Republican presidential candidates made clear, does not subscribe to the same precept.

More importantly, Reagan in 1976 and 1980 was the leader of a resurgent conservative movement, with deep wells of political experience. He had been president of the Screen Actors Guild in the late 1940s, waging a campaign to root out communist infiltrators. He had gone on to work for General Electric in the 1950s as a TV pitchman and after-dinner speaker, honing a business message that resonated beyond the “rubber chicken circuit”.

In 1964 he grabbed headlines with a televised speech on behalf of the Republican presidential candidate, Barry Goldwater – a bright spot in Goldwater’s otherwise ignominious campaign. Two years later he was elected governor of California – serving for eight years as chief executive of the nation’s most populous state. He built a conservative record on welfare reform, law and order, and business regulation that he pushed on to the federal agenda when he ran for president.

All this is to say that Reagan’s candidacy was built on more than his celebrity. By contrast, Trump not only lacks experience as an elected official, he isn’t part of any organised political movement – which enhanced his “outsider” status, perhaps, but not his ground game. So far, he has run on opportunism, tapping in to popular frustration, channelled through a media megaphone.

In Iowa, this wasn’t enough. To win the nomination he will have to do much more to build his organisation. He will be hoping that in the primaries to come, voters do remember who came in second. 

This article first appeared in the 05 February 2015 issue of the New Statesman, Putin's war