A dish best served cold? Labour's revenge on funding

Politicians have avoided democratic accountability for student funding for years. They must stop pas

Whether intentional or otherwise, when Peter Mandelson commissioned the Browne review of higher education funding in November 2009, he dealt the new government a major, early bombshell whilst maintaining the Labour youth vote by keeping tuition fee rises out of the election.

However, he is in good company when it comes to leaving toxic education reforms to future governments. Just as Labour ordered the Browne review, according to the BBC:

"When Labour entered office [in 1997], they inherited a report on higher education funding which had been commissioned by the previous Conservative government.

"The explosive recommendation of the report was that the principle of university education being free at the point of delivery should be scrapped.

"Students would have to make a contribution, said Sir Ron Dearing's landmark report."

Ring any bells? This brought about the current system of tuition fees, just as the Browne report looks set to make further radical alterations to higher education.

If we are to have a fair and fully functioning university system, we need politicians -- from all parties -- who will take responsibility for it rather than passing the buck to avoid electoral debate on the issue.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.