A dish best served cold? Labour's revenge on funding

Politicians have avoided democratic accountability for student funding for years. They must stop pas

Whether intentional or otherwise, when Peter Mandelson commissioned the Browne review of higher education funding in November 2009, he dealt the new government a major, early bombshell whilst maintaining the Labour youth vote by keeping tuition fee rises out of the election.

However, he is in good company when it comes to leaving toxic education reforms to future governments. Just as Labour ordered the Browne review, according to the BBC:

"When Labour entered office [in 1997], they inherited a report on higher education funding which had been commissioned by the previous Conservative government.

"The explosive recommendation of the report was that the principle of university education being free at the point of delivery should be scrapped.

"Students would have to make a contribution, said Sir Ron Dearing's landmark report."

Ring any bells? This brought about the current system of tuition fees, just as the Browne report looks set to make further radical alterations to higher education.

If we are to have a fair and fully functioning university system, we need politicians -- from all parties -- who will take responsibility for it rather than passing the buck to avoid electoral debate on the issue.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.