A dish best served cold? Labour's revenge on funding

Politicians have avoided democratic accountability for student funding for years. They must stop pas

Whether intentional or otherwise, when Peter Mandelson commissioned the Browne review of higher education funding in November 2009, he dealt the new government a major, early bombshell whilst maintaining the Labour youth vote by keeping tuition fee rises out of the election.

However, he is in good company when it comes to leaving toxic education reforms to future governments. Just as Labour ordered the Browne review, according to the BBC:

"When Labour entered office [in 1997], they inherited a report on higher education funding which had been commissioned by the previous Conservative government.

"The explosive recommendation of the report was that the principle of university education being free at the point of delivery should be scrapped.

"Students would have to make a contribution, said Sir Ron Dearing's landmark report."

Ring any bells? This brought about the current system of tuition fees, just as the Browne report looks set to make further radical alterations to higher education.

If we are to have a fair and fully functioning university system, we need politicians -- from all parties -- who will take responsibility for it rather than passing the buck to avoid electoral debate on the issue.

David Lammy. Photo: Getty
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David Lammy calls for parliament to overturn the EU referendum result

The Labour MP for Tottenham said Britain could "stop this madness through a vote in Parliament".

David Lammy, the Labour MP for Tottenham, has called on parliament to stop Brexit.

In a statement published on Twitter, he wrote: "Wake up. We do not have to do this. We can stop this madness and bring this nightmare to an end through a vote in Parliament. Our sovereign Parliament needs to now vote on whether we should exit the EU. 

"The referendum was an advisory, non-binding referendum. The Leave campaign's platform has already unravelled and some people wish they hadn't voted to Leave. Parliament now needs to decide whether we should go forward with Brexit, and there should be a vote in Parliament next week. Let us not destroy our economy on the basis of lies and the hubris of Boris Johnson."

Lammy's words follow a petition to re-run the referendum, which has gathered 1.75 million signatures since Friday.

However, the margin of victory in the referendum - more than a million votes - makes it unlikely party leaders would countenance any attempt to derail the Brexit process. On Saturday morning, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said there should be no second referendum. Tory leader David Cameron has also accepted the result, and triggered a leadership election.

It is true, though, that had Britain's EU membership been decided in parliament, rather than by a referendum, there would have been an overwhelming vote to Remain. Just 138 Tory MPs declared for Leave, compared with 185 for Remain. In Labour, just 10 declared for Leave, versus 218 for Remain, while no Lib Dem, Scottish Nationalist, Plaid Cymru, Sinn Fein or SDLP MPs backed Leave.

Rob Ford, an academic who has studied Ukip voters, said Lammy's call was "utter madness":