Daily Star publishes spoof Chile mine story

Tabloid "reveals" that Chile mine is to be turned into a theme park.

Star

Today's Daily Star "exclusively" reveals that Chilean tourist bosses are planning to turn the country's San José Mine into a theme park. The tabloid reports:

The Chilean Tourist Board now aims to turn the mine site into a money-spinning theme park. They are also set to offer adventure holidays including a trip underground on the rescue capsule that brought the 33 to safety.

No decision has been made on when it could be opened but a spokesman for Turismo Chile said: "We think many people will be attracted. There is great tourist potential.

But, unusually for an exclusive, the story wasn't followed up by the world's media. In fact, as a quick Google reveals, the only other site to have carried the story was the suggestively named The Spoof.

Spoof

One only wonders why the Star didn't also cover the news that a Chilean Miner Diet book is in the works after the 30 miners "collectively lost 750kg" in two months.

Hat-tip: Tabloid Watch.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.