Ed Balls and civil liberties

What does this appointment show about Ed Miliband's commitment to a liberal approach?

The appointment of Ed Balls as shadow Home Secretary is remarkable and disappointing, for it appears only explicable in terms of Ed Miliband seeking to marginalise an internal party rival.

Last week I wrote that Miliband's leadership speech made the right noises about civil liberties and human rights.

But the first real test of this commitment seems to have been flunked. Balls voted strongly for ID cards and, as Education Secretary, promoted surveillance and database policies with far more enthusiasm than his job required.

One can see why Miliband wanted to keep Balls from the shadow chancellorship. One can also see why the success of Yvette Cooper required her to have one of the top shadow cabinet positions.

But this appointment -- on the basis of Balls' record to date -- does not indicate a serious commitment by the new Labour leader to reversing his party's post-2001 position as the illiberal party in UK politics.

Perhaps Balls will prove this indication wrong.

For there can be no doubt that the Coalition needs to be attacked from the left on a range of Home Office matters.

David Allen Green is a lawyer and writer. He blogs for the New Statesman on legal and policy matters.

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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