Rupert Murdoch: the movie

Watch the media tycoon’s battle with the New York Times in animated form.

Taiwan's Apple Daily has struck again with another of its hilarious political animations, this time featuring Rupert Murdoch and his bid to win control of New York's newspaper market and drive the New York Times out of business.

Particular highlights include the Murdoch rising from the Hudson with a shark fin strapped to his back (0:24), firing a branded News Corporation "money cannon" into the air (0:50), and then a West Side Story-style gang fight between journalists from the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, while the subtitles make a point about journalistic excellence (1:10).

With the News of the World phone-hacking allegations now to be investigated by a second parliamentary committee, grave questions are being raised about the behaviour of Murdoch's media empire.

But that doesn't make the video any less enjoyable.

 

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

Photo: Getty
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Britain's largest communications union to affiliate to Momentum

The CWU, one of Corbyn's earliest backers, will formally affliate to the organisation.

One of Labour’s largest trade unions is set to affiliate to Momentum after the ruling executive of the Communications Workers Union voted unanimously to join the organisation.

The CWU, Britain’s largest communications union and the fifth largest affiliate to Labour, was one of the earliest backers of Jeremy Corbyn. 

Dave Ward, the union’s general secretary, told the New Statesman that “the general election showed the value of Momentum as part of the wider labour movement”, and that the body, which emerged out of Jeremy Corbyn’s 2015 leadership campaign, was now “a major political force in the UK”, saying it had a  “key role to play in securing a transformative Labour government”.

The NEC’s vote will now go to a ratifying vote by the CWU’s annual conference. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.