Lib Dem website hit by abusive tweets

Party’s website carries attack on Miriam Clegg and reports of activist discontent.

After the Tories' "Cash Gordon" campaign was forced off the web by abusive tweets, you would have thought political parties would have learned the dangers of unmoderated Twitter streams.

But clearly not the Lib Dems. Their website currently features all tweets using the #ldconf hashtag but, as the screenshots below show, the comments aren't all flattering.

Tweet

An attack on the leader's wife, for example, isn't the sort of thing most parties want prominently displayed on their website.

Tweet

And there's more, as the screenshot above shows. The former Labour PPC Luke Pollard's tweet on activist discontent also appeared at the top of the site's conference section.

Tweet

Another tweet reported: "#ldconf hall virtually deserted, one activist gave huge yawn." Which isn't the sort of material likely to attract the masses to Conference 2012.

A recent report concluded that Nick Clegg needs more staff to avoid being "overwhelmed", in which case he might want to begin by hiring a few web moderators.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Martin Sorrell: I support a second EU referendum

If the economy is not in great shape after two years, public opinion on Brexit could yet shift, says the WPP head.

On Labour’s weakness, if you take the market economy analogy, if you don’t have vigorous competitors you have a monopoly. That’s not good for prices and certainly not for competition. It breeds inefficiency, apathy, complacency, even arrogance. That applies to politics too.

A new party? Maybe, but Tom Friedman has a view that parties have outlived their purpose and with the changes that have taken place through globalisation, and will do through automation, what’s necessary is for parties not to realign but for new organisations and new structures to be developed.

Britain leaving the EU with no deal is a strong possibility. A lot of observers believe that will be the case, that it’s too complex a thing to work out within two years. To extend it beyond two years you need 27 states to approve.

The other thing one has to bear in mind is what’s going to happen to the EU over the next two years. There’s the French event to come, the German event and the possibility of an Italian event: an election or a referendum. If Le Pen was to win or if Merkel couldn’t form a government or if the Renzi and Berlusconi coalition lost out to Cinque Stelle, it might be a very different story. I think the EU could absorb a Portuguese exit or a Greek exit, or maybe even both of them exiting, I don’t think either the euro or the EU could withstand an Italian exit, which if Cinque Stelle was in control you might well see.

Whatever you think the long-term result would be, and I think the UK would grow faster inside than outside, even if Britain were to be faster outside, to get to that point is going to take a long time. The odds are there will be a period of disruption over the next two years and beyond. If we have a hard exit, which I think is the most likely outcome, it could be quite unpleasant in the short to medium term.

Personally, I do support a second referendum. Richard Branson says so, Tony Blair says so. I think the odds are diminishing all the time and with the triggering of Article 50 it will take another lurch down. But if things don’t get well over the two years, if the economy is not in great shape, maybe there will be a Brexit check at the end.

Martin Sorrell is the chairman and chief executive of WPP.

As told to George Eaton.

This article first appeared in the 30 March 2017 issue of the New Statesman, Wanted: an opposition