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CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. If you don't like the voters, they won't like you (Times) (£)

Ed Miliband needs to win back the centre ground, says Daniel Finkelstein, but he won't succeed unless he knows what makes it tick.

2. Ed Miliband will say anything if it means getting into Downing St (Daily Telegraph)

Simon Heffer warns that Labour had better beware its new leader, because his only creed is expediency.

3. Forget about Ed's redness. The economy is the only game in town (Guardian)

Simon Jenkins points out that Osborne has taken an almighty gamble. If Britain double-dips into recession, Ed Miliband will hold all the cards.

4. Miliband must toughen up on cuts (Financial Times) (£)

Labour needs to show it is economically competent in bad times as well as good, writes Kitty Ussher, the director of Demos.

5. The limits of localism (Independent)

This leading article discusses Jeremy Hunt's plans to encourage local TV -- is the government actually promoting a narrow private interest?

6. Competition and confusion for local media (Guardian)

It's difficult to make sense of Jeremy Hunt's plans for local media, says Jane Martinson. Diversity of opinion will suffer.

7. Stop navel-gazing and admit something's wrong (Times) (£)

Ben Bernanke's defence of economics merely confirms that it is clinging to outdated and discredited theories, says Anatole Kaletsky.

8. David Cameron's Conservatives are mistaken if they believe they won the election (Daily Telegraph)

There are several reasons for the Conservatives' failure in the election campaign -- but being insufficiently right-wing isn't one of them, says Philip Cowley.

9. Harsh realities for North Korea's unseen heir (Financial Times) (£)

The Kim family has no choice now but to shelter under China's wing, writes Aidan Foster-Carter. It is the only country that can save North Korea from itself.

10. In the complex ecosystem of British arts, weeds are as important as trees (Guardian)

Charlotte Higgins says that the idea that the likes of Glyndebourne thrive without public money is dangerously simplistic with cuts in the offing.