Shadow cabinet elections: runners and riders

Your guide to all the confirmed candidates for the shadow cabinet elections.

With the shadow cabinet elections due to start as soon as the new Labour leader takes over, I thought it would be worth putting together a list of all declared candidates.

Below are the 43 confirmed candidates, with links to their "Vote for me" letters where appropriate.

Douglas Alexander

Hilary Benn

Ben Bradshaw

Roberta Blackman-Woods

Kevin Brennan

Liam Byrne

Chris Bryant

Vernon Coaker

Yvette Cooper

Mary Creagh

Wayne David

Angela Eagle

Maria Eagle

Caroline Flint

Mike Gapes

Barry Gardiner

Helen Goodman

Peter Hain

David Hanson

Tom Harris

John Healey

Meg Hillier

Huw Irranca-Davies

Alan Johnson

Tessa Jowell

Eric Joyce

Barbara Keeley

Sadiq Khan

David Lammy

Chris Leslie

Ivan Lewis

Ian Lucas

Pat McFadden

Fiona Mactaggart

Ann McKechin

Alun Michael

Gareth Thomas

Emily Thornberry

Stephen Timms

Stephen Twigg

Rosie Winterton

Shaun Woodward

Iain Wright

Also likely to run

Ed Balls (If defeated in leadership election)

Andy Burnham (If defeated)

John Denham

Jack Dromey

David Miliband (if defeated)

Ed Miliband (if defeated)

Jim Murphy

Gerry Sutcliffe

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Getty Images.
Show Hide image

Theresa May knows she's talking nonsense - here's why she's doing it

The Prime Minister's argument increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in her words - the Tories your vote.

Good morning.  Angela Merkel and Theresa May are more similar politicians than people think, and that holds true for Brexit too. The German Chancellor gave a speech yesterday, and the message: Brexit means Brexit.

Of course, the emphasis is slightly different. When May says it, it's about reassuring the Brexit elite in SW1 that she isn't going to backslide, and anxious Remainers and soft Brexiteers in the country that it will work out okay in the end.

When Merkel says it, she's setting out what the EU wants and the reality of third country status outside the European Union.  She's also, as with May, tilting to her own party and public opinion in Germany, which thinks that the UK was an awkward partner in the EU and is being even more awkward in the manner of its leaving.

It's a measure of how poor the debate both during the referendum and its aftermath is that Merkel's bland statement of reality - "A third-party state - and that's what Britain will be - can't and won't be able to have the same rights, let alone a better position than a member of the European Union" - feels newsworthy.

In the short term, all this helps Theresa May. Her response - delivered to a carefully-selected audience of Leeds factory workers, the better to avoid awkward questions - that the EU is "ganging up" on Britain is ludicrous if you think about it. A bloc of nations acting in their own interest against their smaller partners - colour me surprised!

But in terms of what May wants out of this election - a massive majority that gives her carte blanche to implement her agenda and puts Labour out of contention for at least a decade - it's a great message. It increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in May's words - the Tories your vote. You may be unhappy about the referendum result, you may usually vote Labour - but on this occasion, what's needed is a one-off Tory vote to make Brexit a success.

May's message is silly if you pay any attention to how the EU works or indeed to the internal politics of the EU27. That doesn't mean it won't be effective.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

0800 7318496