Live blog: Labour leadership

Minute-by-minute coverage as the new Labour leader is announced.

16:05 The delegates are being played a video (soundtrack: Bloc Party's "So Here We Are") before Labour's general secretary, Ray Collins, arrives to announce the result.

16:10 Ray Collins has taken to the stage, praising a "long and inspiring contest".

16:14 He is introducing Gordon Brown, who will make a rare speech shortly, to applause from the audience. He praises Brown for reducing poverty at home and abroad and for preventing a "second Great Depression".

16:18 Gordon Brown, along with his wife, Sarah, takes to the stage to the strains of James Brown's "Soulman".

16:19 Brown says he has come here to thank the party he has always served and will serve "for all his life". He praises Harriet Harman, who steps down as acting leader today, as a "tireless champion of equality".

16:21 Brown is on strong form. Among friends and freed of the burden of office, his voice soars as it did during his Citizens UK address.

16:23 There's praise for Brown's predecessors. John Smith, for committing the party to a national minimum wage; Neil Kinnock, for his socialist values; and Tony Blair for peace in Northern Ireland.

16:27 Brown says that Labour is now "the only progressive party" Britain has, to loud applause from the crowd.

16:29 He's really enjoying this. He calls for "markets with morals" and hails Labour as the "greatest fighting force for fairness this country has ever seen".

16:30 Brown leaves the stage to a standing ovation.

16:32 We're due to hear from Harriet Harman in the next few minutes. But first Ray Collins introduces (another) video.

16:35 Harman, widely thought to have done a fine job as acting leader, is speaking now.

16:41 Harman hands over to Ann Black, the chair of the party's NEC, who introduces the candidates.

16:43 David comes out smiling but Ed looks nervous. Is this a clue?

16:45 Here come the first-round results.

First round

Diane Abbott: 7.4%, Ed Balls: 11.8%. Andy Burnham: 8.7%. David Miliband: 37.8%. Ed Miliband: 34.3%.

Abbot is eliminated.

Second round

Balls: 13.2%, Burnham: 10.4%, D Miliband: 38.9%, E Miliband: 37.5%.

Burnham is out.

Third round

Balls: 16%, D Miliband: 42.7%, E Miliband 41.3%.

Fourth round

It's over. Ed Miliband is elected Labour leader with 50.6% of the vote. He's speaking now.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Will Jeremy Corbyn stand down if Labour loses the general election?

Defeat at the polls might not be the end of Corbyn’s leadership.

The latest polls suggest that Labour is headed for heavy defeat in the June general election. Usually a general election loss would be the trigger for a leader to quit: Michael Foot, Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband all stood down after their first defeat, although Neil Kinnock saw out two losses before resigning in 1992.

It’s possible, if unlikely, that Corbyn could become prime minister. If that prospect doesn’t materialise, however, the question is: will Corbyn follow the majority of his predecessors and resign, or will he hang on in office?

Will Corbyn stand down? The rules

There is no formal process for the parliamentary Labour party to oust its leader, as it discovered in the 2016 leadership challenge. Even after a majority of his MPs had voted no confidence in him, Corbyn stayed on, ultimately winning his second leadership contest after it was decided that the current leader should be automatically included on the ballot.

This year’s conference will vote on to reform the leadership selection process that would make it easier for a left-wing candidate to get on the ballot (nicknamed the “McDonnell amendment” by centrists): Corbyn could be waiting for this motion to pass before he resigns.

Will Corbyn stand down? The membership

Corbyn’s support in the membership is still strong. Without an equally compelling candidate to put before the party, Corbyn’s opponents in the PLP are unlikely to initiate another leadership battle they’re likely to lose.

That said, a general election loss could change that. Polling from March suggests that half of Labour members wanted Corbyn to stand down either immediately or before the general election.

Will Corbyn stand down? The rumours

Sources close to Corbyn have said that he might not stand down, even if he leads Labour to a crushing defeat this June. They mention Kinnock’s survival after the 1987 general election as a precedent (although at the 1987 election, Labour did gain seats).

Will Corbyn stand down? The verdict

Given his struggles to manage his own MPs and the example of other leaders, it would be remarkable if Corbyn did not stand down should Labour lose the general election. However, staying on after a vote of no-confidence in 2016 was also remarkable, and the mooted changes to the leadership election process give him a reason to hold on until September in order to secure a left-wing succession.

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