In Video: Ed Miliband speaks at New Statesman party

Watch Ed Miliband’s speech at the NS Labour conference reception.

The New Statesman was lucky enough to have the new Labour leader, Ed Miliband, say a few words at its reception at Labour conference.

His speech to the well-refreshed and boisterous crowd touched on some of the main themes he hopes will characterise his leadership of the party.

First, Miliband focused on the need to build "a mass party, like we did in 1997". Then he called for an end to the infighting and factionalism that dogged the Blair-Brown years. His duty as leader, Ed said, "is to unify the party. We will have no more factions in this party. We will have a united party."

Most of the speech was devoted to the need to win back young people, and how to make Labour an inspiring party to join once more. "The way you become an inspiring party to join is by not being part of the establishment, and being willing to question and challenge old truths."

"Whether it is civil liberties, or climate change, or foreign policy, we've got to be the party that is willing to question old truths. I think we can become the natural home of young people and people who want an inspiring politics again -- but we need to change in order to do that."

You can watch the full speech below.

New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.