Web Only: the best of the blogs

The five must-read posts from today, including Jon Cruddas, and the odds on the next Labour leader.

1. Labour turns its back on Scotland

Benedict Brogan comments on the fact that there might be only one Scot in the shadow cabinet -- an unexpected consquence.

2. Ten things we learned from Andrew Rawnsley's interview with Jon Cruddas

Rawnsley interviewed the leftwing MP at a Labour conference fringe event last night. The Guardian's Polly Curtis spells out what the interview revealed.

3. HenryG's top tips for EdM's successor

Believe it or not, Ladbrokes has already priced up its market for the next Labour leader. Political Betting summarises the odds.

4. Why the UK is entering the economic danger zone

Liberal Conspiracy's Duncan Weldon discusses figures that show a strong recovery built on fragile foundations -- foundations that Osborne is about to demolish.

5. Davis joins Miliband with warning on growth

Over at Left Foot Forward, Will Straw notes that David David has expressed a similar aim Ed Miliband, though they differ on methodology.

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Gerald Kaufman dies aged 86

Before becoming an MP, Kaufman's varied career included a stint as the NS' theatre critic.

Gerald Kaufman, the Labour MP for Manchester Gorton and former theatre critic at the New Statesman, has died.

Kaufman, who served as the MP for Manchester Gorton continuously from 1970, had a varied career before entering Parliament, working for the Fabian Society in addition to his flourishing career in journalism and as a satirist, writing for That Was The Week That Was and as a leader writer on the Mirror. In 1965, he exchanged the press for politics, working as a press officer and an aide to Harold Wilson before he was elected to parliament in 1970.

Upon Labour’s return to office in 1974, he served as a junior minister until the party’s defeat in 1979, and on the opposition frontbenches until 1992, reaching the position of shadow foreign secretary. In 1999, he was chair of the Man Booker Prize, which that year was won by JM Coetzee’s Disgrace.

His death opens up a by-election in Manchester Gorton, which Labour is expected to win. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.