David Miliband tops poll of Labour councillors

Ed Miliband comes second with 43 per cent to his brother’s 57; Ed Balls is eliminated first.

The BBC's Daily Politics show will shortly unveil the results of a new poll of Labour councillors in which David Miliband comes out first with 57 per cent of the vote, compared to his brother's 43.

Diane Abbott came third on first preferences, but the more surprising fact, perhaps, is that Ed Balls was eliminated first, with just 8 per cent, with Andy Burnham bowing out in the next round.

However, it is definitely worth noting that this poll was conducted by ComRes between 23 July and 10 August, so it will not reflect any of the more recent events in the leadership contest, in particular, Balls's recent strong performance opposing the coalition on the deficit, and the Blairites' intervention in the struggle between the Milibands.

And, need one say, a poll of 265 councillors is hardly representative of Labour's electoral college as a whole. But perhaps what this poll does reiterate is how vital second preferences are going to be in determining who becomes Labour's next leader.

Full results (via Left Foot Forward)

First preference votes

88 (33%) David Miliband
69 (26%) Ed Miliband
55 (21%) Diane Abbott
33 (12%) Andy Burnham
20 (8%) Ed Balls

Elimination round 1

96 (36%) David Miliband
74 (28%) Ed Miliband
62 (23%) Diane Abbott
33 (12%) Andy Burnham
1st eliminated: Ed Balls

Elimination round 2

110 (42%) David Miliband
82 (31%) Ed Miliband
73 (28%) Diane Abbott
2nd eliminated: Andy Burnham
1st eliminated: Ed Balls

Elimination round 3

152 (57%) David Miliband
113 (43%) Ed Miliband
3rd eliminated: Diane Abbott
2nd eliminated: Andy Burnham
1st eliminated: Ed Balls

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman. She writes a weekly podcast column.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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