Nominations success for the New Statesman

NS editor Jason Cowley and deputy editor Jon Bernstein pick up nominations at BSME Awards.

The nominations for this year's BSME Awards (the Oscars of the media world) have just been released and there's more good news for the NS.

After winning the award last year, Jason Cowley has been nominated as Editor of the Year in the newspaper and current affairs category. And Jon Bernstein has been nominated as Website Editor of the Year. Thanks to all our readers.

Here are the nominations in full:

Editor of the Year (Newspaper and Current Affairs Magazines)

Gillian de Bono: How to Spend It (Financial Times)

James Collard: The Times Luxx (News International)

Jason Cowley: New Statesman (Progressive Media)

Michael Elliott: TIME (TIME Inc)

Sally Eyden: Fabulous (News International)

Louise France: The Times Magazine (News International)

Michele Lavery: Telegraph Magazine (Telegraph Media Group)

Merope Mills: Guardian Weekend (Guardian News & Media)

Website Editor of the Year (Consumer)

Jon Bernstein: newstatesman.com (Progressive Media)

Ollie Brock: granta.com (Granta Publications)

James Dyer: Empire Online (Bauer Media)

Dolly Jones: vogue.com -- UK (Condé Nast Digital)

Andrea McGinniss: bbcgoodfood.com (BBC Worldwide)

Nate Lanxon: wired.co.uk (Condé Nast Digital)

Kay McMahon: wallpaper.com (IPC Media)

David Moynihan: nme.com (IPC Media)

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.