Lib Dems plunge to new poll low of 11 per cent

How low will Nick Clegg’s party go?

Away from the excitement, despair and outrage over Tony Blair's memoir, politics continues as usual -- the Lib Dems have hit a new poll low.

The latest daily YouGov poll puts Nick Clegg's party on just 11 per cent -- a level of support not seen since the dark days of Ming Campbell's resignation in October 2007. The Tories are on a healthy 43 per cent, with Labour 5 points behind on 38 per cent. If repeated at the election on a uniform swing, the latest figures would see Clegg's party reduced to a rump of just 11 seats.

New Statesman Poll of Polls

Poll

Hung parliament: Conservatives 14 seats short.

Lib Dem ministers will shrug and declare, "There's only one poll that counts, and that's on election day," but the party's terrible ratings are beginning to sap morale among activists and we can expect tensions to grow in the run-up to conference season.

For the Conservatives, the long-term fear is that the fall in Lib Dem popularity may eventually make the coalition unworkable, and that Lib Dem MPs, fearful of losing their seats, will begin to rebel to maintain their distinctiveness.

Ether way, both parties should prepare for much worse once those 25 per cent cuts kick in.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.