CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. We can survive a dip but we risk a fatal plunge (Times)

Anatole Kaletsky warns that if growth falters and the coalition doesn't moderate its macho cuts, a vicious downward spiral beckons, which could start a prolonged, potentially catastrophic recession.

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2. It's time to stand up to the Treasury (Independent)

Christina Patterson urges Iain Duncan Smith to hold his ground in his row with the Treasury over funding for his welfare reforms.

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3. A Lib Dem civil war? Surely we're forgetting something (Guardian)

John Harris looks ahead to potential tension at the Lib Dem conference. That the party has delivered power will probably be more than enough to keep a lid on any trouble.

4. Bush tax cuts for the rich must go (Financial Times)

By letting the tax cuts for the top 2 per cent of households expire on schedule, say John Podesta and Robert Greenstein, policymakers can continue to help middle-class families while harvesting low-hanging fruit on deficit reduction.

5. Parties must abandon the sordid dash for cash (Times)

MPs waste too much time sucking up to rich donors, says Alice Thomson. No one gives money to a political party unless they expect something in return -- which is exactly what they get.

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6. In the name of purity, public funds are wasted on the rich (Guardian)

From IVF to universities and museums, says Simon Jenkins, Britain's aversion to charging for services punishes women, students and the poor. Charging, paying and pricing must not be seen as morally corrupt.

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7. The myth of the forgotten middle class (Independent)

There is no danger that politicians will forget the concerns of the middle class, says the Labour leadership hopeful Diane Abbott. Only when the party leaves the "New Labour" era behind will voters of all classes trust it again.

8. There is an alternative to a shrivelled Britain (Times)

Another Labour leadership contender, David Miliband, argues that it's not denial to reject the coalition's plans on deficit reduction. It is Labour's duty to expose the risks of economic masochism and the "big society".

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9. We need states to be smarter, not bigger (Financial Times)

Ajay Chhibber, UN assistant secretary general, asks what the appropriate role of the state is after the financial crisis. It has reached its size-limit in the developed world, but could up its role in finance.

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10. Deluges after the deluge (Guardian)

Catastrophic floods in Pakistan are likely to recur, warns Julian Hunt, as global warming combines with El Niño, a climate pattern that occurs across the tropical Pacific Ocean every five years on average.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.