Andy Burnham slips up on the BBC

Labour leadership candidate puts his foot in it as he condemns the BBC for being too “London-centric

Andy Burnham has long been a staunch supporter of Top of the Pops, so when he was asked at a Labour leadership campaign event in Nottingham this week whether he still planned to lobby for the programme to be returned to the BBC, his answer was a foregone conclusion, according to today's diary in the Independent.

But as well as praising the show, he went on to complain that the BBC was too "London-centric", perhaps referring to the ongoing controversy over the reluctance of certain BBC bosses to relocate to new premises in Salford. According to Burnham, the Beeb has also lost touch with "ordinary people" -- and he went on to rachet up the rhetoric, saying that "they'd never hire someone like John Peel now".

Unfortunately for Burnham, the BBC hired someone very like John Peel just a few months ago -- his son Tom Ravenscroft, in fact. Tom has a weekly show championing new music on the recently resurgent BBC 6 Music.

However, as a colleague of mine here at the NS has just pointed out to me, the son of John Peel isn't exactly an "ordinary person", as the Independent seems to imply -- in fact, he's a quasi-celebrity who surely had a rather extraordinary upbringing. But the slip-up is something of a blow to a candidate who has campaigned relentlessly on his "ordinary" credentials, going out of his way to demonstrate the "elitist" qualities of his opponents and seizing every opportunity to present himself as the choice for "ordinary people".

"Ordinary" or otherwise, looking out of touch on an issue that he's campaigned on for several years isn't going to provide the last-minute boost his campaign so sorely needs.

Read the recent NS interview with Andy Burnham here.

Caroline Crampton is assistant editor of the New Statesman.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.