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CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from the Sunday papers.

1. An early warning of the tornadoes of trouble facing the coalition (Observer)

The furore around Michael Gove is a foretaste of the troubles the coalition will face over cuts, says Andrew Rawnsley.

2. Labour must leave a door ajar for Clegg (Independent on Sunday)

The party's priority ought to be to ensure that it would be a more attractive coalition partner than the Tories if there is another hung parliament, argues John Rentoul.

3. Face it, Palin will be the Republican nominee (Sunday Times)

Everything Sarah Palin has done these past few months confirms her deadly seriousness about the future, writes Andrew Sullivan.

4. Rupert Murdoch may be evil, but that doesn't mean his paywall is (Observer)

Those, like the Guardian, who argue that content should be free for moral reasons are playing an extremely dangerous game, says David Mitchell.

5. Slippery ahead, so avoid Greece (News of the World)

Fraser Nelson says that the question terrifying ministers is a fairly simple one: will the cuts cause riots?

6. Copying the NHS is the last thing the US should do (Sunday Telegraph)

The future of health care lies in a combination of state provision and private contribution, argues Janet Daley. It is a lesson that Britain and the US need to accept.

7. Liam Fox has a lot to prove in the coming months (Mail on Sunday)

Fox, one of the few genuine right-wingers in the cabinet, must now persuade a sceptical country that trying to fix a "broken, 13th-century country" is worth the bones of even one British soldier, says James Forsyth.

8. In the face of narcissism, the police should stick to policing (Independent on Sunday)

Northumberland Police's decision to appeal to Raoul Moat's emotions was a horribly misplaced attempt at empathy, argues Joan Smith.

9. Yes, minister -- we're still not fit for purpose (Sunday Times)

Unless Michael Gove quickly gets rid of the officials responsible for his discomfiture, it will be his head on the block next time, says Martin Ivens.

10. We have abandoned the Haitians (Observer)

It is time to demonstrate that the developed world can engage in the affairs of a troubled state without special interest, says an Observer editorial.

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