Ann Widdecombe rules out Vatican appointment

The former government minister turns down the post, citing a detached retina, and heads for Strictly

Ann Widdecombe has turned down the post of UK ambassador to the Vatican because of a detached retina, she told the Times this weekend.

As I blogged a little over a week ago, doubt had been cast on her chances of succeeding Francis Campbell in the post after she signed up to appear in the autumn series of the BBC's reality show Strictly Come Dancing.

Now, she has told the Times that she was unable to take the post because of an operation to repair a detached retina. However, it seems clear that she was made a definite offer, and that she regrets being obliged to turn it down. She said:

The good reason is that I have just had an operation for a detached retina. I am very sorry about Rome. I would have gone otherwise.

However, in the same interview, the Times reports that she dismissed the Strictly claims as "rumour and speculation", which seems to run counter to the Daily Mail, which reported several weeks ago that she had been confirmed to appear on the show.

Another likely candidate for the Vatican post, Chris Patten, has not yet been offered the job, but Times sources suggest he is unlikely to accept because of his duties as chancellor of Oxford University.

Other reputed candidates are Paul Murphy, the former Northern Ireland secretary, and Ruth Kelly, rumoured to be a member of Opus Dei. Given Widdecombe's popularity on both sides, it will take something special to equal the momentum she had. But the BBC's William Crawley believes he's found it -- how about Tony Blair?

Caroline Crampton is web editor of the New Statesman.

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To stop Jeremy Corbyn, I am giving my second preference to Andy Burnham

The big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Voting is now underway in the Labour leadership election. There can be no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn is the frontrunner, but the race isn't over yet.

I know from conversations across the country that many voters still haven't made up their mind.

Some are drawn to Jeremy's promises of a new Jerusalem and endless spending, but worried that these endless promises, with no credibility, will only serve to lose us the next general election.

Others are certain that a Jeremy victory is really a win for Cameron and Osborne, but don't know who is the best alternative to vote for.

I am supporting Liz Kendall and will give her my first preference. But polling data is brutally clear: the big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Andy can win. He can draw together support from across the party, motivated by his history of loyalty to the Labour movement, his passionate appeal for unity in fighting the Tories, and the findings of every poll of the general public in this campaign that he is best placed candidate to win the next general election.

Yvette, in contrast, would lose to Jeremy Corbyn and lose heavily. Evidence from data collected by all the campaigns – except (apparently) Yvette's own – shows this. All publicly available polling shows the same. If Andy drops out of the race, a large part of the broad coalition he attracts will vote for Jeremy. If Yvette is knocked out, her support firmly swings behind Andy.

We will all have our views about the different candidates, but the real choice for our country is between a Labour government and the ongoing rightwing agenda of the Tories.

I am in politics to make a real difference to the lives of my constituents. We are all in the Labour movement to get behind the beliefs that unite all in our party.

In the crucial choice we are making right now, I have no doubt that a vote for Jeremy would be the wrong choice – throwing away the next election, and with it hope for the next decade.

A vote for Yvette gets the same result – her defeat by Jeremy, and Jeremy's defeat to Cameron and Osborne.

In the crucial choice between Yvette and Andy, Andy will get my second preference so we can have the best hope of keeping the fight for our party alive, and the best hope for the future of our country too.

Tom Blenkinsop is the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland