CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. Mandelson: the little men's history (Guardian)

New Labour-era memoirs reveal smaller-than-life individuals for whom world events play second fiddle to petty obsessions, writes Gary Younge.

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2. So that's OK then. It's fine to abuse young girls, as long as you're a great film director (Independent)

The campaign in defence of Roman Polanski has ensured that a bragging child-rapist won't face his day in court, says Johann Hari.

3. Can the coalition triumph on the battlefield where Tony Blair was beaten? (Daily Telegraph)

Fraser Nelson asks whether the coalition can defeat the quangos, unions and bureaucracies that blocked public service reform during the Blair years.

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4. An authentic voice will end this psychodrama (Times)

The fracturing at the top of New Labour mirrored insecurity throughout, writes Rachel Sylvester. If the party is to succeed, it must rediscover its voice.

5. Cameron must make the case for talks with the Taliban (Guardian)

David Cameron should come out publicly for Washington to open contacts with the Taliban and make the case strongly at the White House next week, argues Jonathan Steele.

6. Political squalls before the cuts get serious (Financial Times)

Ministers would be wise not to sound quite so enthusiastic about making ferocious spending cuts, says Philip Stephens.

7. Church unmilitant (Times)

Rather than prioritising Anglican unity, Rowan Williams should show leadership by insisting on the validity of women bishops, argues a leader in the Times.

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8. Andrew Lansley's £80bn adventure (Guardian)

Lansley's NHS reforms hand the bulk of the health budget to GPs who have shown little interest in embracing that responsibility, says Michael White.

9. American business sours on China (Financial Times)

Corporate America is showing increasing signs of disillusionment with China, writes Gideon Rachman.

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10. Somalia projects a message of violence (Independent)

The latest terrorist atrocity proves that treating Somalia as just another part of the international war on terror and al-Qaeda is self-defeating, warns a leading article in the Independent.

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Watch: The evidence Nigel Farage said money sent to the EU should go to the NHS

After the EU referendum result, Nigel Farage said it was a "mistake" for Leave to suggest funds could go to the NHS. But what's this?

Remember Friday? (I know: it's not necessarily a pleasant thing to do, but bear with me.) On Friday, hours after the result of the EU referendum was announced, Nigel Farage appeared on Good Morning Britain and said that the Leave campaign advertising which linked the extra "£350m a week" Brexit would allegedly gift us with the NHS was a "mistake".

Sure, it was on posters, and emblazoned on a bus, and he didn't speak up to disabuse anyone of the notion. But let's give Farage the benefit of the doubt and pretend he does sorely regret the fact that, through no fault of his own, members of the electorate may have been led to believe that that money would be put into healthcare. It must be tough, when you ought to be high on your victory, to have to answer for other people's mistakes

Ah. Hold that thought.

It looks like the Independent has unearthed a video of Nigel Farage on television before the vote, and  strange thing  he tells Hilary Benn that the money currently being sent to Europe should be spent on, er, "schools, hospitals and the NHS".

Well, this mole isn't sure what to say. Maybe Farage doesn't remember this specific moment? Maybe when he said "schools, hospitals and the NHS" he actually meant something different, like "negotiating our exit from the EU", or "paying to access the common market despite no longer being a member"? Or maybe when he said that money should be spent on these things, he didn't mean it necessarily would be, and it would have been entirely unreasonable for the voting public to make such an absurd leap?

All I can suggest is that you watch and decide for yourself, dear reader.

I'm a mole, innit.