Do Cameron and Clegg now share a speechwriter?

Striking similarities between the party leaders’ speeches.

Downing Street has just issued the full text of David Cameron's "big society" speech in Liverpool this morning. One thing that immediately stands out, as Andrew Sparrow notes, is how similar Cameron and Nick Clegg now sound.

Here's Clegg at the pair's first press conference:

For me, that is what liberalism is all about: ensuring that everyone has the chance, no matter who they are and where they are from, to be the person they want to be. To live the life they want to live. You can call it fairness. You can call it responsibility. You can call it liberalism. Whatever words you use, the change it will make to your life is the same.

And here's Cameron today:

Let me briefly explain what the "big society" is and why it is such a powerful idea.You can call it liberalism. You can call it empowerment. You can call it freedom. You can call it responsibility. I call it the "big society".

There has never been a Conservative prime minister, not even Margaret Thatcher, willing to speak of "liberalism" in such positive terms. Not all in Cameron's party, particularly those on its social conservative wing, will be comfortable with his embrace of what is, after all, a rival ideology.

It all points to the fact, as I have repeatedly argued, that Cameron views the coalition not as an alliance of convenience, but as a vehicle to realign British politics. Those who speculate that the Tories are considering a snap election to "dump" the Lib Dems couldn't be more wrong.

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Owen Smith apologises for pledge to "smash" Theresa May "back on her heels"

The Labour leader challenger has retracted his comments. 

Labour leader challenger Owen Smith has apologised for pledging to "smash" Theresa May "back on her heels", a day after vigorously defending his comments.

During a speech at a campaign event on Wednesday, Smith had declared of the prime minister, known for wearing kitten heels:

"I'll be honest with you, it pained me that we didn’t have the strength and the power and the vitality to smash her back on her heels and argue that these our values, these are our people, this is our language that they are seeking to steal.”

When pressed about his use of language, Smith told journalists he was using "robust rhetoric" and added: "I absolutely stand by those comments."

But on Thursday, a spokesman for the campaign said Smith regretted his choice of words: "It was off script and on reflection it was an inappropriate choice of phrase and he apologises for using it."

Since the murder of the MP Jo Cox in June, there has been attempt by some in politics to tone down the use of violent metaphors and imagery. 

Others though, have stuck with it - despite Jeremy Corbyn's call for a "kinder, gentler politics" his shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell, described rebel MPs as a "lynch mob without the rope"

Smith's language has come under scrutiny before. In 2010, when writing about the Tory/Lib-Dem coalition, he asked: "Surely, the Liberal will file for divorce as soon as the bruises start to show through the make-up?"

After an outcry over the domestic violence metaphor, Smith edited the piece.