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The five must-reads posts from today, on the unions, Ed Balls and Oona King’s mayoral campaign.

1. How unions could play deciding role in Labour leadership

The Guardian's Patrick Wintour looks at which Labour leadership candidate is likely to win the most support from the trade unions.

2. The case against Ed Balls

Tom Bage of Labour Uncut responds to Kerry McCarthy's Staggers post, arguing that Balls is perceived as being more directly implicated in the bitter battles of the Brown-Blair era than the other candidates.

3. An electoral problem

As new data shows how many young Lib Dems failed to vote, Mark Pack explores ways for the party to improve this state of affairs.

4. Oona King unveils strong support against Ken

With two days left until nominations for Labour's London mayoral candidate close, Oona King has revealed that she is backed by 11 MPs across the capital. Sunny Hundal has the details.

5. Ireland: United it stands?

Jon Snow wonders whether the burgeoning nationalist middle class in Northern Ireland would actually vote to unite with the south.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.