Refugee and Migrant Justice placed into administration

Crisis deepens for the asylum charity.

Refugee and Migrant Justice, whose future was reported to be under threat earlier this month, has today gone into administration. The charity, which provides legal support to thousands of asylum-seekers across England and Wales, is suffering a cash-flow crisis because of changes to the system of legal aid payments.

Paul Gray, the chair of RMJ, said:

It is with great sadness that RMJ's trustees took the decision . . . we are very concerned about the position of our 10,000 clients, and of our dedicated and highly professional staff.

This situation is caused by late payment of legal aid by up to two years, not inefficiency or even lack of income . . . Late payment has an unequal impact on charities because they cannot get bank loans to finance the cash gap.

Public figures including the Archbishop of Canterbury, Shami Chakrabarti and the film director Ken Loach have called for the charity to be rescued. Coalition ministers have already promised a review of legal aid and to speed up the asylum system, but have so far refused to change payment rules set in place by the last government.

Daniel Trilling is the Editor of New Humanist magazine. He was formerly an Assistant Editor at the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.