In this week’s New Statesman: The new age of ideas

The truth about the Milibands | Gove’s Thatcherite agenda | The World Cup and women.

This week's cover

More than 200 years on from the original, it might just be time for a 21st-century enlightenment and in this week's cover story, Matthew Taylor, head of the Royal Society of Arts, outlines the new political and social ideas that will define our future.

Elsewhere, as the Labour leadership race warms up, James Macintyre uncovers the truth about the fascinating duel between David and Ed Miliband. And online, don't miss our essential guide to where the candidates stand on the key political issues.

In this week's politics column, Mehdi Hasan takes Michael Gove to task over his education reforms and warns that they will widen, not narrow, the gulf between the rich and the poor. Also look out for Alice Miles on why the World Cup is good for the family, Kevin Maguire's Westminster diary, and our complete guide to the deficit, national debt and the coming cuts.

The issue is on sale now, or you can subscribe through the website.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.