Kyrgyzstan crisis: in pictures

Violence against ethnic Uzbeks in Kyrgyzstan has left at least 178 people dead and up to 275,000 dis

Above, Uzbek women mourn in Jalal-Abad. The violence broke out last Friday and quickly spread to the village from Osh, 25 miles away, and to other Uzbek villages in the south.

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Men cry in the village of Shark, outside Osh, by a destroyed building.

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A wrecked building near the People's Friendship University in Jalal-Abad.

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Ethnic Uzbek men dig graves in Osh. According to the official toll, 178 people are dead. Many on the ground claim this is a huge underestimate, and that the real figure is closer to 2,000.

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Men pray at a funeral in Osh. The clashes are the worst ethnic violence to hit southern Kyrgyzstan since 1990. Government forces are accused of being complicit in the slaughter.

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Ethnic Uzbek women cry and plead for help at a refugee camp in Nariman, ten kilometres outside Osh, on the border with Uzbekistan. Up to 200,000 Uzbeks are homeless but stranded in Kyrgyzstan.

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Refugees gather by the border with Uzbekistan. On Monday, the country ordered its borders closed to tens of thousands of refugees. About 75,000 are thought to have crossed the frontier before this.

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Uzbeks hand bread over the border to refugees in the Nariman camp.

All photos from AFP/Getty Images.

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Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Exclusive: Shami Chakrabarti set to become shadow attorney general

The Labour peer and former Liberty director is expected to join Jeremy Corbyn's team next week. 

With the conclusion of Labour conference (here are five lessons from it), Jeremy Corbyn's attention will turn to assembling a new shadow cabinet. The leadership is expected to agree to allow MPs to elect a proportion of the frontbench. But Corbyn intends to begin appointments next week in advance of a deal.

Shami Chakrabarti, who recently became a Labour peer and chaired the party's anti-Semitism inquiry, is set to become shadow attorney general, I can reveal. The barrister and former Liberty director "wants to do more" and the "gig is a no brainer," a source said. Her slated brief has been unfilled since Karl Turner's resignation in June. 

Others expected to join the shadow cabinet include Keir Starmer (who could become shadow home secretary following Andy Burnham's departure), former shadow housing minister John Healey and former shadow Wales secretary Nia Griffith. Stephen Pound is said to have turned down the post of shadow leader of the House, currently filled by 81-year-old Paul Flynn, who doubles up as shadow Wales secretary. In his conference speech, he praised Corbyn's "job creation scheme for geriatrics". 

The Labour reshuffle is expected to begin next Wednesday, the day the Conservative conference ends. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.