Hague announces “judge-led” torture inquiry

How much of the inquiry will be heard in public, and does David Miliband have anything to worry abou

The Foreign Secretary, William Hague (typing that still feels strange), has said that he will order a "judge-led" inquiry into allegations that the UK's security services were complicit in torture.

This is a very positive step, and puts into practice something that both the Lib Dems and the Conservatives called for in opposition following the Binyam Mohamed case.

Essentially, the allegation is that British security services and the British government subcontracted torture -- sending UK residents and citizens abroad, where they knew they were likely to face torture, even if they did not specifically recommend it.

It is not clear yet what form the inquiry will take. Hague said only:

We will be setting out in the not-too-distant future what we are going to do about allegations that have been made into complicity in torture. We will make a full announcement that we are working on now. We want a judge-led inquiry.

A key question will be how much of the inquiry is heard in public. The high court battle to get the Foreign Office to share evidence in the Mohamed case suggest that it will primarily take place behind closed doors.

While the new government will be keen to avoid the accusation of a whitewash in this attempt to demonstrate a break with the past, there will be a strong national interest defence for keeping key details private. The secret services are not shy about employing this.

Writing in the Guardian, Ian Cobain is hopeful, noting that:

It is expected to expose not only details of the activities of the security and intelligence officials alleged to have colluded in torture since 9/11, but also the identities of the senior figures in government who authorised those activities.

While the first senior figure that springs to mind is, of course, Tony Blair, there are others with more at stake. What about David Miliband? Any responsible inquiry will have to ask what he -- and the then home secretary, Alan Johnson -- knew about the practice of rendition established in the Blair/Bush era, and whether they did anything about it.

Today, Johnson declared his withdrawal from frontbench politics. Miliband, currently the front-runner for the Labour leadership, has rather more at stake. When it comes to the murky area of torture and rendition, he certainly does not want to be tarred as the heir to Blair.

Special offer: get 12 issues of the New Statesman for just £5.99 plus a free copy of "Liberty in the Age of Terror" by A C Grayling.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty Images/Christopher Furlong
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A dozen defeated parliamentary candidates back Caroline Flint for deputy

Supporters of all the leadership candidates have rallied around Caroline Flint's bid to be deputy leader.

Twelve former parliamentary candidates have backed Caroline Flint's bid to become deputy leader in an open letter to the New Statesman. Dubbing the Don Valley MP a "fantastic campaigner", they explain that why despite backing different candidates for the leadership, they "are united in supporting Caroline Flint to be Labour's next deputy leader", who they describe as a "brilliant communicator and creative policy maker". 

Flint welcomed the endorsement, saying: "our candidates know better than most what it takes to win the sort of seats Labour must gain in order to win a general election, so I'm delighted to have their support.". She urged Labour to rebuild "not by lookin to the past, but by learning from the past", saying that "we must rediscover Labour's voice, especially in communities wher we do not have a Labour MP:".

The Flint campaign will hope that the endorsement provides a boost as the campaign enters its final days.

The full letter is below:

There is no route to Downing Street that does not run through the seats we fought for Labour at the General Election.

"We need a new leadership team that can win back Labour's lost voters.

Although we are backing different candidates to be Leader, we are united in supporting Caroline Flint to be Labour's next deputy leader.

Not only is Caroline a fantastic campaigner, who toured the country supporting Labour's candidates, she's also a brilliant communicator and creative policy maker, which is exactly what we need in our next deputy leader.

If Labour is to win the next election, it is vital that we pick a leadership team that doesn't just appeal to Labour Party members, but is capable of winning the General Election. Caroline Flint is our best hope of beating the Tories.

We urge Labour Party members and supporters to unite behind Caroline Flint and begin the process of rebuilding to win in 2020.

Jessica Asato (Norwich North), Will Straw (Rossendale and Darween), Nick Bent (Warrington South), Mike Le Surf (South Basildon and East Thurrock), Tris Osborne (Chatham and Aylesford), Victoria Groulef (Reading West), Jamie Hanley (Pudsey), Kevin McKeever (Northampton South), Joy Squires (Worcester), Paul Clark (Gillingham and Rainham), Patrick Hall (Bedford) and Mary Wimbury (Aberconwy)

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.