Tory lead cut to just 5 points in new YouGov poll

Tories just 5 points ahead of Labour as Lib Dems drop 4 points to 24 per cent.

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Latest poll (YouGov/Sun): Labour 49 seats short of a majority.

The latest daily YouGov poll has just been published, and it's not good news for the Lib Dems. The poll puts Nick Clegg's party down 4 points to 24 per cent, its lowest figure in a YouGov poll since the first leaders' debate. Now, this could be a sign that the Lib Dem bubble has burst or, like the Ipsos MORI poll that put them on 23 per cent, it could just be an outlier.

We'll get a better idea when the latest ComRes/Independent poll is released later tonight, although, since their fieldwork is a day behind YouGov's, any decline in Lib Dem support may not be picked up.

Meanwhile, the Conservatives' lead over Labour has been cut to just 5 points. The poll has the Tories unchanged on 35 per cent, with Labour up 2 to 30 per cent. If repeated at the election on a uniform swing, those figures would leave Labour as the single largest party in parliament, 49 seats short of a majority.

New Statesman Poll of Polls

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Hung parliament: Conservatives 53 seats short.

UPDATE: The latest ComRes poll has just been published and there's not much to report there. The Tories are unchanged on 37 per cent, Labour is unchanged on 29 per cent and the Lib Dems are, you guessed it, unchanged on 26 per cent.

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.