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CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. What we'll lose if we reject Labour (Independent)

Johann Hari says that a vote against Labour would be a betrayal of the party that gave us higher public spending, the minimum wage, tax credits and civil partnerships. Tactical voting by the anti-Tory majority could deny David Cameron outright victory and pave the way for electoral reform.

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2. The last Brown and Cameron battle could be yet to come (Guardian)

If Labour comes a decent second in the popular vote and even wins the largest number of seats, Gordon Brown will stay put in Downing Street and call the Lib Dems' bluff, says Seumas Milne. The Prime Minister is even expected to offer a referendum on full proportional representation.

3. Unsure how to vote? My contortions may help (Times)

David Aaronovitch argues that while Britain needs a new prime minister, the country also needs a Labour Party that can still be the best hope for social justice at home and progress abroad. Voters should choose Labour over the opportunistic and self-interested Liberal Democrats.

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4. Reform the euro or bin it (Guardian)

The Greek financial crisis has put the very survival of the euro at risk, says Joseph Stiglitz. Europe must implement the institutional reforms that should have been made when the currency was launched.

5. BP is drilling itself into deep water (Financial Times)

The BP Gulf of Mexico disaster is an example of the safety and environmental dangers that it and other oil companies face by drilling in such difficult spots, writes John Gapper.

6. Back the person, not the party (Independent)

Voters should support the candidate most likely to raise the quality of the House of Commons, says Andreas Whittam Smith. That means ruling out expenses cheats as well as timeservers.

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7. Call in the IMF to tell us how bad it really is (Times)

If the Conservatives win tomorrow, they should turn to the IMF to lay out a plan that the government can present as the Authorised Version, writes Camilla Cavendish.

8. The fantastical dream of a united Korea (Financial Times)

Polls may suggest that half of all South Koreans wish for national reunification, but North Koreans rarely receive a warm welcome when they enter the country, says David Pilling.

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9. My moment is yours, Balls (Guardian)

Ed Balls should not despair if he loses his seat tonight, says Michael Portillo. Life is better outside Westminster.

10. A bracing reminder of the price we pay for political freedom (Daily Telegraph)

Benedict Brogan reflects on a visit to the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire and recalls that the greatest duty of the nation and its politicians is to remember the cost of freedom.

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