Diane Abbott for leader could help women everywhere

Just getting Abbott’s name on the ballot paper will show that women in politics can be taken serious

I have absolutely no doubt that Diane Abbott's candidacy will be greeted with hilarity in much of the media, and among some on the Labour benches as well. But before MPs turf her back to north London with their mockery ringing in her ears, they should stop and think. The vacuum of female representation on the front benches of all three main political parties, which has become clearer since the election, has been utterly shocking to women.

Women need women to be in high-profile positions in politics because only then do policies that help women advance (I shall write more about this in my column next week). There is a clear correlation between female representation and feminised policymaking. Which isn't just about maternity leave and child benefit, but tax credits and public services and community support -- all the things that vulnerable women and their families rely on to survive.

This is the female agenda and it needs to be articulated. In the week in which Theresa May spent her time at the Police Federation fielding questions about her shoes, and Andy Burnham was widely being described as a candidate "for the ladies" because apparently he has pretty eyes, we must have one woman in this contest who can show that women are serious politically.

I am not a particular fan of Diane Abbott and I hugely respect some of the male candidates. But if I were a Labour MP today, I would be backing Diane Abbott, just to get her name on to that ballot paper.

Special offer: get 12 issues of the New Statesman for just £5.99 plus a free copy of "Liberty in the Age of Terror" by A C Grayling.

Getty
Show Hide image

Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

0800 7318496