Ed Balls progresses in Labour leadership race

Former schools secretary just one vote away from making it on to the ballot paper.

Labour has just updated the nominations counter on its website and there's some good news for Ed Balls. After being forced to deny that he would struggle to achieve the required 33 nominations, the former schools secretary is now just one vote away from making it on to the ballot paper.

It's worth noting that Yvette Cooper and John Healey are the only shadow cabinet members to have nominated him.

I expect that Balls's many opponents (inside and outside of the cabinet) will be pleased he's progressing. A large number believe it essential that he is defeated decisively in an open contest.

Elsewhere, David Miliband remains in the lead with 54 nominations, while Ed Miliband has 45. Andy Burnham has 17 nominations, but with 103 votes left to play for, he's still in with a shout of making it on to the ballot. But it doesn't look like either John McDonnell or Diane Abbott will do so. McDonnell has just six nominations and Abbott one (from David Lammy).

Here's a guide to who the shadow cabinet have nominated so far (those yet to nominate in bold):

Douglas Alexander (David Miliband)

Ed Balls (himself)

Hilary Benn (Ed Miliband)

Ben Bradshaw

Nick Brown

Liam Byrne

Andy Burnham (himself)

Yvette Cooper (Ed Balls)

Alistair Darling

John Denham (Ed Miliband)

Peter Hain (Ed Miliband)

Harriet Harman

John Healey (Ed Balls)

Tessa Jowell (pledged to support David Miliband)

Alan Johnson (David Miliband)

Sadiq Khan (Ed Miliband)

Pat McFadden (David Miliband)

David Miliband

Ed Miliband (himself)

Jim Murphy (David Miliband)

Jack Straw

Shaun Woodward

Rosie Winterton (Ed Miliband)

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.