Election results: as they come out

Who has won -- or lost -- in each constituency.

Our rolling guide to the results as they come in. A party needs to win 326 seats for a Commons majority.

Labour

Number of seats won so far: 110

1. Houghton and Sunderland South (Bridget Phillipson, with 50 per cent of the votes. This seat saw an 8.4 per cent swing from Labour to the Conservatives)

2. Washington and Sunderland West (Sharon Hodgson, with 53 per cent of the vote. This was a swing of 11.6 per cent from Labour to the Conservatives)

3. Sunderland Central (Julie Elliott, with 45.9 per cent of the vote. This was a swing of 4.8 per cent from Labour to the Conservatives)

4. Darlington (Jenny Chapman. Labour held on to the seat, but with a swing of 9.1 per cent from Labour to Conservative)

5. Durham North (Kevan Jones. A similar picture to Darlington, with an 8.9 per cent swing from Labour to the Tories)

6. Motherwell and Whishaw (Frank Roy)

7. Yynys Môn (Albert Owen)

8. Sedgefield (Phil Wilson)

9. Rutherglen and Hamilton West (Tom Greatrex)

10. East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow (Michael McCann)

11. Easington (Grahame Morris)

12. Vale of Clywd (Chris Ruane)

13. Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath (Gordon Brown)

14. Middlesbrough (Stuart Bell)

15. Telford (David Wright)

16. Islwyn (Christopher Evans)

17. Llanelli (Nia Griffith)

18. Lanark and Hamilton East (Jim Hood)

19. Tooting (Sadiq Khan)

20. Dundee West (Jim McGovern)

21. Glenrothes (Lindsay Roy)

22. Blaenau Gwent (Nick Smith)

23. Coatbridge (Tom Clarke)

24. Gedling (Vernon Coaker)

25. Falkrik (Eric Joyce)

26. Exeter (Ben Bradshaw)

27. Newport East

28. Barnsley Central (Eric Illsley)

29. Inverclyde

30. Ogmore

31. Halton

32. Dunfermline and Fife West

33. Derbyshire North-East

34. Bolton North-East

35. Airdrie and Shotts

36. Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney (Dai Harvard)

37. Clwyd South

38. Cumbernauld

39. Midlothian

40. Neath

41. Stockton North

42. Linlinthgow and Falkirk East

43. Durham North-West

44. City of Durham

45. Nottingham North

46. East Kilbride Strathaven

47. Caerphilly

48. Hull West and Hessle (Alan Johnson)

49. Renfrewshire East (Jim Murphy)

50. Blackpool South (Doreen Holt)

51. Derbyshire North-East (Richard Bull)

52. Workington

53. Newport West

54. Dunbartonshire West

55. Hartlepool

56. Nottingham North

57. Barnsley East

58. Hull East

59. Cardiff South

60. Strangford

61. Luton North

62. Bolton South-East

63. Broxtowe

64. Rother Valley

65. Doncaster North (Ed Miliband)

66. Wentworth and Dearne

67. Stoke-on-Trent North

68. Aberdeen North

69. Bolsolver

70. Edinburgh South-West (Alistair Darling)

71. Glasgow North-West

72. Glasgow North-East

73. Doncaster General

74. Edinburgh North

75. Nottingham East

76. Luton North

77. Birmingham Ladywood

78. Wentworth and Dearne

79. Newcastle-upon-Tyne Central

80. Oxford East

81. Ayrshire Central

82. Rotherham

83. Cardiff West

84. Dumfries and Galloway

85. Torfaen

86. Makerfield

87. Pontypridd

88. Rhondda

89. Jarrow

90. Knowsley

91. Warley

92. West Bromwich East

93. Derby North

94. Wigan

95. Edmonton

96. Great Grimsby

97. Ochil and South Perthshire

98. Hyndburn

99. Barrow and Furness

100. Preston

101. West Bromwich West

102. Ashfield

103. Birmingham Northfield

104. Middlesbrough South

105. Worsley and Eccles South

106. Luton South

107. Leigh

108. Westminster North

109. Islington South

110. Leeds North-East

111. Morley and Outwood

Conservatives

Number of seats won so far: 124

1. Kingswood (Chris Skidmore. Won the seat from Labour, with a swing of 9.4 per cent)

2. Putney (Justine Greening. A swing of 9.9 per cent from Labour to the Tories)

3. Basildon South (Stephen Metcalfe)

4. Broxbourne (Charles Walker)

5. Rushcliffe (Ken Clarke)

6. The Wrekin (Mark Pritchard)

7. Christchurch (Christopher Chope)

8. Guildford (Anne Milton)

9. Sevenoaks (Michael Fallon)

10. Newbury (Richard Benyon)

11. Bedfordshire South-West (Andrew Selous)

12. Staffordshire Moorlands (Karen Bradley)

13. Clacton (Douglas Carswell)

14. Battersea (Jane Ellison)

15. Loughborough

16. Havant

17. Canterbury

18. Dorset West (Oliver Letwin)

19. Tunbridge Wells

20. Suffolk Central and Ipswich North

21. Vale of Glamorgan

22. Charnwood

23. Castle Point

24. Devon East

25. Montgomeryshire

26. Spelthorne

27. Nuneaton

28. Braintree

29. Stafford

30. Folkestone and Hythe

31. Chester

32. Burton

33. Totnes

34. Yorkshire East

35. Suffolk East

36. Beverley

37. Wyre and Preston North

38. Thanet North

39. Weston-super-Mare

40. Grantham

41. Suffolk Coastal

42. Boston and Skegness

43. Spelthorne

44. Bosworth

45. Eddisbury

46. Witney

47. Swindon North

48. Mid-Bedfordshire

49. Bournemouth East

50. Suffolk West

51. Witham

52. Erewash

53. Surrey East

54. Pendle

55. Dover

56. Tiverton and Honiton

57. Louth and Horncastle

58. Clwyd West

59. Henley

60. Runnymede and Weybridge

61. Hampshire East

62. Worcestershire West

63. Bournemouth West

64. Harlow

67. Wycombe

68. Thanet South

69. Bexhill and Battle

70. Wellingborough

71. Bedfordshire North-East

72. Suffolk South

73. Newton Abbot

74. Dartford

75. Welwyn Hatfield

76. Derbyshire Dales

77. Wantage

78. Bognor Regis

79. Crewe and Nantwich

80. Epsom and Ewell

81. Lincoln

82. Bedford

83. Maldon

84. Surrey Heath

85. Epping Forest

86. Reigate

87. Bury St Edmunds

88. Richmond (Yorks)

89. Ashford

90. Newark

91. Lincoln

92. Bournemouth East

93. Hastings and Rye

94. Dumfriesshire, Clydesdale and Tweeddale

95. Forest of Dean

96. Brentwood

97. Gainsborough

98. Romsey and Southampton North

99. Ludlow

100. New Forest West

101. Peterborough

102. Stratford-upon-Avon

103. Macclesfield

104. Wyre Forest

105. Burton

106. The Cotswolds

107. Mid-Derbyshire

108. Hereford South

109. Northamptonshire South

110. St Albans

111. Wiltshire North

112. Tonbrige and Malling

113. Dudley South

114. Haltemprice and Howden

115. Preseli Pembrokeshire

116. Stroud

117. Swindon South

118. Windsor

119. Brigg and Goole

120. Corby

121. Northampton South

122. Redditch

123. Southend West

124. Great Yarmouth

Liberal Democrats

Number of seats won so far: 27

1. Thornbury and Yate (Steve Webb, with a 4.3 per cent swing from Lib Dem to Conservative)

2. Torbay (Adrian Sunders, Lib Dem deputy chief whip, held on to his seat with 47 per cent of the vote. There was a slight swing of 1.1 per cent swing to the Conservatives)

3. Fife North-East (Menzies Campbell)

4. Yeovil (David Laws)

5. Eastbourne (Stephen Lloyd)

6. Somerton and Frome

7. Eastleigh (Chris Huhne)

8. Taunton

9. Lewes

10. Dunbartonshire East

11. Cardiff Central

12. Burnley

13. Devon North

14. Edinburgh West

15. Ceredigion

16. Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross

17. Bath

18. Berwickshire

19. Brecon and Radnorshire

20. Bristol West

21. Southport

22. Norfolk North

23. Aberdeen West

24. Carshalton

25. Inverness

26. Colchester

27. Norwich South

Democratic Unionist Party

Number of seats won so far: 3

1. North Antrim (Ian Paisley Jr, with 46.4 per cent of the vote)

2. Lagan Valley (Jeffrey Donaldson)

3. East Antrim (Sammy Wilson)

Sinn Fein

Number of seats won so far: 3

1. West Tyrone (Pat Doherty with 48.4 per cent of the vote. Swing of 3.8 per cent from the Democratic Unionist Party to Sinn Fein)

2. Belfast West (Gerry Adams)

3. Mid-Ulster

The Alliance Party

Number of seats won so far: 1

1. Belfast East

Plaid Cyrmu

Number of seats won so far: 1

1. Arfon

Scottish National Party

Number of seats won so far: 2

1. Angus (Mike Weir)

2. Dundee East (Stewart Hosie)

Social Democratic Labour Party

Number of seats won so far: 1

1. Belfast South (Alasdair McDonnell)

2. South Down

Independents

Number of seats won so far: 1

1. North Down (Sylvia Hermon)

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An unmatched font of knowledge

Edinburgh’s global reputation as a knowledge economy is rooted in the performance and international outlook of its four universities.

As sociologist-turned US Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan recognised when asked how to create a world-class city, a strong academic offering is pivotal to any forward-looking, ambitious city. “Build a university,” he said, “and wait 200 years.” He recognised the long-term return such an investment can deliver; how a renowned academic institution can help attract the world. However, in today’s increasingly globalised higher education sector, world-class universities no longer rely on the world coming to come to them – their outlook is increasingly international.

Boasting four world-class universities, Edinburgh not only attracts and retains students from around the world, but also increasingly exports its own distinctively Scottish brand of academic excellence. In fact, 53.9% of the city’s working age population is educated to degree level.

In the most recent QS World University Rankings, the University of Edinburgh was named as the 21st best university in the world, reflecting its reputation for research and teaching. It’s a fact reflected in the latest UK Research Exercise Framework (REF), conducted in 2014, which judged 96% of its academic departments to be producing world-leading research.

Innovation engine

Measured across the UK, annual Gross Value Added (GVA) by University of Edinburgh start-ups contributes more than £164m to the UK economy. In fact, of 262 companies to emerge from the university since the 1960s, 81% remain active today, employing more than 2,700 staff globally. That performance places the University of Edinburgh ahead of institutions such as MIT in terms of the number of start-ups it generates; an innovation hothouse that underlines why one in four graduates remain in Edinburgh and why blue chip brands such as Amazon, IBM and Microsoft all have R&D facilities in the city.

One such spin out making its mark is PureLiFi, founded by Professor Harald Haas to commercialise his groundbreaking research on data transmission using the visible light spectrum. With data transfer speeds 10,000 times faster than radio waves, LiFi not only enables bandwidths of 1 Gigabit/sec but is also far more secure.

Edinburgh’s universities play a pivotal role in the local economy. Through its core operations, knowledge transfer activities and world-class research the University generated £4.9bn in GVA and 44,500 jobs globally, when accounting for international alumni.

With £1.4bn earmarked for estate development over the next 10 years, the University of Edinburgh remains the city’s largest property developer. Its extensive programme of investment includes the soon-to-open Higgs Centre for Innovation. A partnership with the UK Astronomy Technology Centre, the new centre will open next year and will supply business incubation support for potential big data and space technology applications, enabling start-ups to realise the commercial potential of applied research in subjects such as particle physics.

It’s a story of innovation that is mirrored across Edinburgh’s academic landscape. Each university has carved its own areas of academic excellence and research expertise, such as the University of Edinburgh’s renowned School of Informatics, ranked among the world’s elite institutions for Computer Science. 

The future of energy

Research conducted into the economic impact of Heriot-Watt University demonstrated that it generates £278m in annual GVA for the Scottish economy and directly supports more than 6,000 jobs.

Set in 380-acres of picturesque parkland, Heriot-Watt University incorporates the Edinburgh Research Park, the first science park of its kind in the UK and now home to more than 40 companies.

Consistently ranked in the top 25% of UK universities, Heriot-Watt University enjoys an increasingly international reputation underpinned by a strong track record in research. 82% of the institution’s research is considered world-class (REF) – a fact reflected in a record breaking year for the university, attracting £40.6m in research funding in 2015. With an expanding campus in Dubai and last year’s opening of a £35m campus in Malaysia, Heriot-Watt is now among the UK’s top five universities in terms of international presence and numbers of international students.

"In 2015, Heriot-Watt University was ranked 34th overall in the QS ‘Top 50 under 50’ world rankings." 

Its established strengths in industry-related research will be further boosted with the imminent opening of the £20m Lyell Centre. It will become the Scottish headquarters of the British Geological Survey, and research will focus on global issues such as energy supply, environmental impact and climate change. As well as providing laboratory facilities, the new centre will feature a 50,000 litre climate change research aquarium, the UK Natural Environment Research Council Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) in Oil and Gas, and the Shell Centre for Exploration Geoscience.

International appeal

An increasingly global outlook, supported by a bold international strategy, is helping to drive Edinburgh Napier University’s growth. The university now has more than 4,500 students studying its overseas programmes, through partnerships with institutions in Hong Kong, Singapore, China, Sri Lanka and India.

Edinburgh Napier has been present in Hong Kong for more than 20 years and its impact grows year-on-year. Already the UK’s largest higher education provider in the territory, more than 1,500 students graduated in 2015 alone.

In terms of world-leading research, Edinburgh Napier continues to make its mark, with the REF judging 54% of its research to be either world-class or internationally excellent in 2014. The assessment singled out particular strengths in Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences, where it was rated the top UK modern university for research impact. Taking into account research, knowledge exchange, as well as student and staff spending, Edinburgh Napier University generates in excess of £201.9m GVA and supports 2,897 jobs in the city economy.

On the south-east side of Edinburgh, Queen Margaret University is Scotland’s first university to have an on-campus Business Gateway, highlighting the emphasis placed on business creation and innovation.

QMU moved up 49 places overall in the 2014 REF, taking it to 80th place in The Times’ rankings for research excellence in the UK. The Framework scored 58% of Queen Margaret’s research as either world-leading or internationally excellent, especially in relation to Speech and Language Sciences, where the University is ranked 2nd in the UK.

In terms of its international appeal, one in five of Queen Margaret’s students now comes from outside the EU, and it is also expanding its overseas programme offer, which already sees courses delivered in Greece, India, Nepal, Saudi Arabia and Singapore.

With 820 years of collective academic excellence to export to the world, Edinburgh enjoys a truly privileged position in the evolving story of academic globalisation and the commercialisation of world-class research and innovation. If he were still around today, Senator Moynihan would no doubt agree – a world-class city indeed.

For further information www.investinedinburgh.com