Election results: as they come out

Who has won -- or lost -- in each constituency.

Our rolling guide to the results as they come in. A party needs to win 326 seats for a Commons majority.

Labour

Number of seats won so far: 110

1. Houghton and Sunderland South (Bridget Phillipson, with 50 per cent of the votes. This seat saw an 8.4 per cent swing from Labour to the Conservatives)

2. Washington and Sunderland West (Sharon Hodgson, with 53 per cent of the vote. This was a swing of 11.6 per cent from Labour to the Conservatives)

3. Sunderland Central (Julie Elliott, with 45.9 per cent of the vote. This was a swing of 4.8 per cent from Labour to the Conservatives)

4. Darlington (Jenny Chapman. Labour held on to the seat, but with a swing of 9.1 per cent from Labour to Conservative)

5. Durham North (Kevan Jones. A similar picture to Darlington, with an 8.9 per cent swing from Labour to the Tories)

6. Motherwell and Whishaw (Frank Roy)

7. Yynys Môn (Albert Owen)

8. Sedgefield (Phil Wilson)

9. Rutherglen and Hamilton West (Tom Greatrex)

10. East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow (Michael McCann)

11. Easington (Grahame Morris)

12. Vale of Clywd (Chris Ruane)

13. Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath (Gordon Brown)

14. Middlesbrough (Stuart Bell)

15. Telford (David Wright)

16. Islwyn (Christopher Evans)

17. Llanelli (Nia Griffith)

18. Lanark and Hamilton East (Jim Hood)

19. Tooting (Sadiq Khan)

20. Dundee West (Jim McGovern)

21. Glenrothes (Lindsay Roy)

22. Blaenau Gwent (Nick Smith)

23. Coatbridge (Tom Clarke)

24. Gedling (Vernon Coaker)

25. Falkrik (Eric Joyce)

26. Exeter (Ben Bradshaw)

27. Newport East

28. Barnsley Central (Eric Illsley)

29. Inverclyde

30. Ogmore

31. Halton

32. Dunfermline and Fife West

33. Derbyshire North-East

34. Bolton North-East

35. Airdrie and Shotts

36. Merthyr Tydfil and Rhymney (Dai Harvard)

37. Clwyd South

38. Cumbernauld

39. Midlothian

40. Neath

41. Stockton North

42. Linlinthgow and Falkirk East

43. Durham North-West

44. City of Durham

45. Nottingham North

46. East Kilbride Strathaven

47. Caerphilly

48. Hull West and Hessle (Alan Johnson)

49. Renfrewshire East (Jim Murphy)

50. Blackpool South (Doreen Holt)

51. Derbyshire North-East (Richard Bull)

52. Workington

53. Newport West

54. Dunbartonshire West

55. Hartlepool

56. Nottingham North

57. Barnsley East

58. Hull East

59. Cardiff South

60. Strangford

61. Luton North

62. Bolton South-East

63. Broxtowe

64. Rother Valley

65. Doncaster North (Ed Miliband)

66. Wentworth and Dearne

67. Stoke-on-Trent North

68. Aberdeen North

69. Bolsolver

70. Edinburgh South-West (Alistair Darling)

71. Glasgow North-West

72. Glasgow North-East

73. Doncaster General

74. Edinburgh North

75. Nottingham East

76. Luton North

77. Birmingham Ladywood

78. Wentworth and Dearne

79. Newcastle-upon-Tyne Central

80. Oxford East

81. Ayrshire Central

82. Rotherham

83. Cardiff West

84. Dumfries and Galloway

85. Torfaen

86. Makerfield

87. Pontypridd

88. Rhondda

89. Jarrow

90. Knowsley

91. Warley

92. West Bromwich East

93. Derby North

94. Wigan

95. Edmonton

96. Great Grimsby

97. Ochil and South Perthshire

98. Hyndburn

99. Barrow and Furness

100. Preston

101. West Bromwich West

102. Ashfield

103. Birmingham Northfield

104. Middlesbrough South

105. Worsley and Eccles South

106. Luton South

107. Leigh

108. Westminster North

109. Islington South

110. Leeds North-East

111. Morley and Outwood

Conservatives

Number of seats won so far: 124

1. Kingswood (Chris Skidmore. Won the seat from Labour, with a swing of 9.4 per cent)

2. Putney (Justine Greening. A swing of 9.9 per cent from Labour to the Tories)

3. Basildon South (Stephen Metcalfe)

4. Broxbourne (Charles Walker)

5. Rushcliffe (Ken Clarke)

6. The Wrekin (Mark Pritchard)

7. Christchurch (Christopher Chope)

8. Guildford (Anne Milton)

9. Sevenoaks (Michael Fallon)

10. Newbury (Richard Benyon)

11. Bedfordshire South-West (Andrew Selous)

12. Staffordshire Moorlands (Karen Bradley)

13. Clacton (Douglas Carswell)

14. Battersea (Jane Ellison)

15. Loughborough

16. Havant

17. Canterbury

18. Dorset West (Oliver Letwin)

19. Tunbridge Wells

20. Suffolk Central and Ipswich North

21. Vale of Glamorgan

22. Charnwood

23. Castle Point

24. Devon East

25. Montgomeryshire

26. Spelthorne

27. Nuneaton

28. Braintree

29. Stafford

30. Folkestone and Hythe

31. Chester

32. Burton

33. Totnes

34. Yorkshire East

35. Suffolk East

36. Beverley

37. Wyre and Preston North

38. Thanet North

39. Weston-super-Mare

40. Grantham

41. Suffolk Coastal

42. Boston and Skegness

43. Spelthorne

44. Bosworth

45. Eddisbury

46. Witney

47. Swindon North

48. Mid-Bedfordshire

49. Bournemouth East

50. Suffolk West

51. Witham

52. Erewash

53. Surrey East

54. Pendle

55. Dover

56. Tiverton and Honiton

57. Louth and Horncastle

58. Clwyd West

59. Henley

60. Runnymede and Weybridge

61. Hampshire East

62. Worcestershire West

63. Bournemouth West

64. Harlow

67. Wycombe

68. Thanet South

69. Bexhill and Battle

70. Wellingborough

71. Bedfordshire North-East

72. Suffolk South

73. Newton Abbot

74. Dartford

75. Welwyn Hatfield

76. Derbyshire Dales

77. Wantage

78. Bognor Regis

79. Crewe and Nantwich

80. Epsom and Ewell

81. Lincoln

82. Bedford

83. Maldon

84. Surrey Heath

85. Epping Forest

86. Reigate

87. Bury St Edmunds

88. Richmond (Yorks)

89. Ashford

90. Newark

91. Lincoln

92. Bournemouth East

93. Hastings and Rye

94. Dumfriesshire, Clydesdale and Tweeddale

95. Forest of Dean

96. Brentwood

97. Gainsborough

98. Romsey and Southampton North

99. Ludlow

100. New Forest West

101. Peterborough

102. Stratford-upon-Avon

103. Macclesfield

104. Wyre Forest

105. Burton

106. The Cotswolds

107. Mid-Derbyshire

108. Hereford South

109. Northamptonshire South

110. St Albans

111. Wiltshire North

112. Tonbrige and Malling

113. Dudley South

114. Haltemprice and Howden

115. Preseli Pembrokeshire

116. Stroud

117. Swindon South

118. Windsor

119. Brigg and Goole

120. Corby

121. Northampton South

122. Redditch

123. Southend West

124. Great Yarmouth

Liberal Democrats

Number of seats won so far: 27

1. Thornbury and Yate (Steve Webb, with a 4.3 per cent swing from Lib Dem to Conservative)

2. Torbay (Adrian Sunders, Lib Dem deputy chief whip, held on to his seat with 47 per cent of the vote. There was a slight swing of 1.1 per cent swing to the Conservatives)

3. Fife North-East (Menzies Campbell)

4. Yeovil (David Laws)

5. Eastbourne (Stephen Lloyd)

6. Somerton and Frome

7. Eastleigh (Chris Huhne)

8. Taunton

9. Lewes

10. Dunbartonshire East

11. Cardiff Central

12. Burnley

13. Devon North

14. Edinburgh West

15. Ceredigion

16. Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross

17. Bath

18. Berwickshire

19. Brecon and Radnorshire

20. Bristol West

21. Southport

22. Norfolk North

23. Aberdeen West

24. Carshalton

25. Inverness

26. Colchester

27. Norwich South

Democratic Unionist Party

Number of seats won so far: 3

1. North Antrim (Ian Paisley Jr, with 46.4 per cent of the vote)

2. Lagan Valley (Jeffrey Donaldson)

3. East Antrim (Sammy Wilson)

Sinn Fein

Number of seats won so far: 3

1. West Tyrone (Pat Doherty with 48.4 per cent of the vote. Swing of 3.8 per cent from the Democratic Unionist Party to Sinn Fein)

2. Belfast West (Gerry Adams)

3. Mid-Ulster

The Alliance Party

Number of seats won so far: 1

1. Belfast East

Plaid Cyrmu

Number of seats won so far: 1

1. Arfon

Scottish National Party

Number of seats won so far: 2

1. Angus (Mike Weir)

2. Dundee East (Stewart Hosie)

Social Democratic Labour Party

Number of seats won so far: 1

1. Belfast South (Alasdair McDonnell)

2. South Down

Independents

Number of seats won so far: 1

1. North Down (Sylvia Hermon)

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Air pollution: 5 steps to vanquishing an invisible killer

A new report looks at the economics of air pollution. 

110, 150, 520... These chilling statistics are the number of deaths attributable to particulate air pollution for the cities of Southampton, Nottingham and Birmingham in 2010 respectively. Or how about 40,000 - that is the total number of UK deaths per year that are attributable the combined effects of particulate matter (PM2.5) and Nitrogen Oxides (NOx).

This situation sucks, to say the very least. But while there are no dramatic images to stir up action, these deaths are preventable and we know their cause. Road traffic is the worst culprit. Traffic is responsible for 80 per cent of NOx on high pollution roads, with diesel engines contributing the bulk of the problem.

Now a new report by ResPublica has compiled a list of ways that city councils around the UK can help. The report argues that: “The onus is on cities to create plans that can meet the health and economic challenge within a short time-frame, and identify what they need from national government to do so.”

This is a diplomatic way of saying that current government action on the subject does not go far enough – and that cities must help prod them into gear. That includes poking holes in the government’s proposed plans for new “Clean Air Zones”.

Here are just five of the ways the report suggests letting the light in and the pollution out:

1. Clean up the draft Clean Air Zones framework

Last October, the government set out its draft plans for new Clean Air Zones in the UK’s five most polluted cities, Birmingham, Derby, Leeds, Nottingham and Southampton (excluding London - where other plans are afoot). These zones will charge “polluting” vehicles to enter and can be implemented with varying levels of intensity, with three options that include cars and one that does not.

But the report argues that there is still too much potential for polluters to play dirty with the rules. Car-charging zones must be mandatory for all cities that breach the current EU standards, the report argues (not just the suggested five). Otherwise national operators who own fleets of vehicles could simply relocate outdated buses or taxis to places where they don’t have to pay.  

Different vehicles should fall under the same rules, the report added. Otherwise, taking your car rather than the bus could suddenly seem like the cost-saving option.

2. Vouchers to vouch-safe the project’s success

The government is exploring a scrappage scheme for diesel cars, to help get the worst and oldest polluting vehicles off the road. But as the report points out, blanket scrappage could simply put a whole load of new fossil-fuel cars on the road.

Instead, ResPublica suggests using the revenue from the Clean Air Zone charges, plus hiked vehicle registration fees, to create “Pollution Reduction Vouchers”.

Low-income households with older cars, that would be liable to charging, could then use the vouchers to help secure alternative transport, buy a new and compliant car, or retrofit their existing vehicle with new technology.

3. Extend Vehicle Excise Duty

Vehicle Excise Duty is currently only tiered by how much CO2 pollution a car creates for the first year. After that it becomes a flat rate for all cars under £40,000. The report suggests changing this so that the most polluting vehicles for CO2, NOx and PM2.5 continue to pay higher rates throughout their life span.

For ClientEarth CEO James Thornton, changes to vehicle excise duty are key to moving people onto cleaner modes of transport: “We need a network of clean air zones to keep the most polluting diesel vehicles from the most polluted parts of our towns and cities and incentives such as a targeted scrappage scheme and changes to vehicle excise duty to move people onto cleaner modes of transport.”

4. Repurposed car parks

You would think city bosses would want less cars in the centre of town. But while less cars is good news for oxygen-breathers, it is bad news for city budgets reliant on parking charges. But using car parks to tap into new revenue from property development and joint ventures could help cities reverse this thinking.

5. Prioritise public awareness

Charge zones can be understandably unpopular. In 2008, a referendum in Manchester defeated the idea of congestion charging. So a big effort is needed to raise public awareness of the health crisis our roads have caused. Metro mayors should outline pollution plans in their manifestos, the report suggests. And cities can take advantage of their existing assets. For example in London there are plans to use electronics in the Underground to update travellers on the air pollution levels.

***

Change is already in the air. Southampton has used money from the Local Sustainable Travel Fund to run a successful messaging campaign. And in 2011 Nottingham City Council became the first city to implement a Workplace Parking levy – a scheme which has raised £35.3m to help extend its tram system, upgrade the station and purchase electric buses.

But many more “air necessities” are needed before we can forget about pollution’s worry and its strife.  

 

India Bourke is an environment writer and editorial assistant at the New Statesman.