CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning’s papers.

1. Prepare for a big progressive moment -- in the rematch (Guardian)

If Cameron and Clegg do a deal, says Jackie Ashley, Labour needs urgently to change leader, embrace voting reform and get ready to fight the next election, which could come as soon as this autumn.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

2. Lib Dems must talk to the Tories but they have more in common with Labour (Independent)

Andrew Grice points out that many Tories will not feel comfortable working with the Lib Dems, and the feeling is mutual. The party has more in common with Labour on the economy, Europe and constitutional reform.

3. Building bridges is the way to the future (Times)

Ken Macdonald argues that we need to look beyond modern parties to cleanse the political system of its toxins. This need not be frightening for the left -- there are now echoes of liberal values everywhere.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

4. Get Gordon Brown out of the bathroom and deal with the real problems (Daily Telegraph)

We need to avert our eyes from the soap opera and focus on the economy, argues Boris Johnson -- amid all the discussion of changing the voting system, there is a risk we will forget how it works.

5. The new MPs I'm glad to see (Independent)

The election delivered remarkably enlightened results, says Yasmin Alibhai-Brown. The number of black and Asian members of the House has gone up from 14 to 27.

6. The unappealing choices after an inconclusive election (Financial Times)

Niall Ferguson agrees that the economy is paramount, and looks at ways to deal with this simultaneously, fashioning a decent stretch of Conservative government from the unpromising result of this election.

7. The people have spoken. Don't let the markets shout them down (Guardian)

Gary Younge argues that the clash of democracy and capitalism is as acute as ever, as a discredited financial sector seeks to dictate political terms.

8. Just do it (Times)

The editorial argues that, for both David Cameron and Nick Clegg, the benefits of a deal far outweigh the risks. The national interest, and their own, demand that they reach an agreement.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

9. Mr Clegg should act in the national interest (Independent)

There is scope for agreement between the Tories and the Lib Dems, says the leading article, but Clegg should walk away from any deal that doesn't include a cast-iron commitment to comprehensive voting reform.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

10. America has good reason to worry about Greece (Financial Times)

Clive Crook discusses the Greek crisis. Until now, the US has treated Greece as a European problem that could be left to the EU to solve, but parts of that supposition have turned out to be wrong.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

Special offer: get 12 issues for just £5.99 plus a free copy of "Liberty in the Age of Terror" by A C Grayling.

Getty
Show Hide image

Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

0800 7318496