Mandelson begins to spin his way out of defeat

The Business Secretary suggests making Cameron PM would be a kind of victory for New Labour.

Regardless of the outcome of this election, Peter Mandelson is already trying to spin his way out of defeat. Here's what the silver-tongued First Secretary recently told the NS editor, Jason Cowley:

The point about the Conservatives is that they believe they cannot win an election by running against New Labour. They are for the political landscape that we have created.

The whole point of Cameron's Conservatives is to market his party in a way that leads people to believe they've put their past behind them, that they're a continuum of New Labour.

They are not, as it happens. But the fact that they feel they can only win power by marketing themselves in that way says a lot about the strength of New Labour.

You'll be able to read more from Mandelson in Jason's interview with Gordon Brown for this week's magazine (out tomorrow).

As he writes, it does seem like an attempt by Mandelson "to claim a kind of victory even in defeat". He speaks with the pride of a teacher whose textbook (The Blair Revolution Revisited) has been eagerly devoured, even if not all of the lessons have been learned.

Yet key figures on Labour's centre left, such as Jon Cruddas, argue that the similarities between Cameron's Conservatives and New Labour represent a defeat, not a victory for the party. It is because Labour has been insufficiently bold that the Tories have succeeded in masquerading as progressive, even while pledging to cut taxes for millionaires.

We can expect this division, between those who feel flattered and those who feel enraged by Cameron's rise, to be at the centre of any future Labour leadership contest.

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.