Election 2010 Lookahead: Monday 3 May

The who, when and where of the campaign.

It's a bank holiday, so all campaigning has been suspended. Joke. Here's what is happening three days before polling:

Labour

Tony Blair is expected to be back in the north-east today campaigning for the party he used to lead. Gordon Brown will be in eastern England this morning, before returning to London to speak at an event this afternoon organised by CitizensUK, a body that represents 150 groups including churches, mosques and schools. James Macintyre and Jonathan Derbyshire will be blogging from the event.

 

Conservatives

David Cameron will also be speaking at the central London event this afternoon organised by CitizensUK. The Conservatives will also lay out their plans on equality.

 

Liberal Democrats

Nick Clegg will be back in London this morning to host his party's press conference. He will then join Gordon Brown and David Cameron to address the CitizensUK event in central London.

 

The media

The Daily Politics hosts another of its policy debates. Today it is education with Ed Balls for Labour, Michael Gove for the Conservatives and David Laws for the Lib Dems (BBC2, 2.15pm). Over on Channel 4 there is a Dispatches election special. The journalist Ben Laurence goes behind the scenes of the Labour, Conservative and Liberal Democrat campaigns (8pm).

 

Away from the campaign

It's the annual Stilton Cheese Rolling in . . . er, Stilton. This year's theme is "International Dance". Make of that what you will.

Follow the New Statesman team on Facebook.

Jon Bernstein, former deputy editor of New Statesman, is a digital strategist and editor. He tweets @Jon_Bernstein. 

Matt Cardy/Getty Images
Show Hide image

What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.