Web Only: the best of the blogs

The five must-read blogs from today, on the election, corrections and cereal.

1. However you vote today, demonstrate on Saturday

On Next Left, Stuart Wright implores readers to join the Trafalgar Square demonstration for electoral reform on Saturday, whatever happens overnight.

2. Vote 2010: An election reflection

At Left Foot Forward, Will Straw looks back over an election campaign that has focused on process rather than policy, but argues that Labour is still winning the battle of ideas.

3. The digital general election: three technology trends for next time around

As new media's importance to the 2010 campaign is debated, Martin Belam presents, over at Curry Bet, the techie trends that he expects to see more of at the next election.

4. Philippa Stroud -- a correction

At Liberal Conspiracy, Unity corrects a mistaken report concerning Phillipa Stroud, Tory PPC for Sutton and Cheam, and finds her more Wayne Rooney than J K Rowling.

5. Cheerio! The boxfresh message in crunch Labour marginal

On the Evening Standard blog, Paul Waugh digests a cereal mystery plaguing the Labour marginal of Harrow West.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.