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CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. David Cameron must sweep aside the impostor who stole his act (Sunday Telegraph)

'Calamity Clegg' managed to come across as the candidate of change in Thursday's leader's debate, says Matthew d'Ancona, but we mustn't count the Tory leader out just yet.

2. The battle of the public school boys (Sunday Times)

Dominic Lawson points out that Sigmund Freud had a perfect phrase for the rivalry between David Cameron and Nick Clegg: the narcissism of minor differences. Both are public school and Oxbridge educated.

3. Cam losing it big time (Sunday Mirror)

New Statesman editor Jason Cowley asks whether Cameron will come to regret pushing so hard for Britain's first televised debates. Coupled with unrest inside his own party, things are not getting any easier for the Tory leader.

4. David, face facts - no immigrants means no NHS (Observer)

Still on the subject of Thursday's debate, Carole Cadwalladr argues that Cameron's anti-immigration rant showed that the more traditional Tory values are still alive and kicking.

5. Afghanistan must be debated (Independent on Sunday)

The war in Afghanistan has hardly featured in the election campaign so far, says the leading article. Polls show that the public is unconvinced by the arguments in favour of war. These strategic issues must be raised for the health of our democracy.

6. Does optimism have a place in British politics (Sunday Telegraph)

Janet Daley wonders why Cameron did not mention his Big Society idea in the leaders' debate, since it brings a vote-winning positive dimension to the campaign.

7. This is a radical revolt against the statist approach of Big Government (Observer)

He may not have mentioned it during the debate, but here Conservative leader David Cameron elaborates on his vision for the Big Society, in which Britons are freed from the 'stifling clutch of state control' to shape their own destiny.

8. Surrender now - the army's no place for you, single mum (Sunday Times)

It should not be the role of the armed forces to move in as childcare managers or social workers or flexitime consultants, says Minette Marrin. Tilern DeBique's tribunal victory is a cautionary tale.

9. A test of the rule of law in Pakistan (Independent on Sunday)

The leading article looks at the verdict of the UN committee on the assassination of Benazir Bhutto, which criticised the deficiencies of the Pakistani state. What happens next will indicate whether the country is now any less lawless.

10. So, how do the parties match up on protecting our freedom? (Observer)

The New Labour manifesto asks you to ignore all the suspicion the government has created during its term in office, says Henry Porter, comparing the three main parties' policies on civil liberties.

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