Web Only: the best of the blogs

The five must-read blogs from today on Lord Pearson, the IMF and Osborne's dodgy barnet.

1. Lord Pearson: worst campaign interview ever?

Daniel Finkelstein posts a car crash interview by Ukip leader Lord Pearson.

2. Taxing banks -- the IMF proposals are the best we've seen

Left Foot Forward's Varun Chandra summarises the IMF's proposals for a double-tax on banks, debunking the financial jargon.

3. Tories attempt to tackle the 'anti-politics' problem

Over at Channel 4, Gary Gibbon discusses the Tories' anti-Lib Dem tactics -- should they sack Steve Hilton?

4. Is this how a swing to the LDs would go?

At PoliticalBetting, Mike Smithson carries an animated graphic showing how a big swing to the Lib Dems could change the political map of Britain.

5. Osborne's Bad Hair Day

Finally, Paul Waugh reports on George Osborne's terrible "Brideshead barnet".

 

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Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"