Cameron shamelessly compares himself to Obama

Tory leader compares his vision with the US President's.

Nick Clegg may have been accused of sounding rather like a certain US politician recently (all those references to "hope" and "change") but David Cameron has just taken Obama mimicry to a whole new level.

Here's how he ended his speech on the "broken society" today:

Inspired by the Big Society, not crushed by the effects of big government. Based on hope, optimism and faith in each other. Not rules, regulations and fear of each other. This is what Barack Obama called the audacity of hope. Now it is our turn to dare to believe that we can change our world. Together. All of us. So let's do it.

I think it's safe to assume that Obama, who opposed the Iraq war, supports "spreading the wealth" and believes in the power of government, does not believe that Cameron, who backed the war, plans to cut tax for the rich and believes, absurdly, that "big government" caused the financial crisis, is fit to claim his mantle.

Indeed, on policy areas from Lords reform ("a third-term issue" for Cameron) to the voting system, the Tory leader is not the candidate of change but the candidate of the status quo.

In any case, is it not an indictment of the right that Cameron now attempts to improve his image by comparing himself to a left-liberal politician? It's as good a reminder as any that this is a progressive, not a conservative moment.

 

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Police shoot man in parliament

A man carrying what appeared to be a knife was shot by armed police after entering the parliamentary estate. 

From the window of the parliamentary Press Gallery, I have just seen police shoot a man who charged at officers while carrying what appeared to be a knife. A large crowd was seen fleeing from the man before he entered the parliamentary estate.

After several officers evaded him he was swiftly shot by armed police.

Ministers have been evacuated and journalists ordered to remain at their desks. 

More follows. Read Julia Rampen's news story here.

Armed police at the cordon outside Parliament on Wednesday afternoon. Photo: Getty

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.