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CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. If bombers were a threat once, they still are (Times)

David Aaronovitch argues that it would be disastrous for the UK to distance itself from the United States. The US remains an indispensable, practical and ideological ally in a world where fundamentalist terror has not gone away.

2. Eureka! At last, I can see what David Cameron is on about (Daily Telegraph)

Cameron's "Big Society" project is truly radical, says Benedict Brogan. Here is a rare example of a politician who has faith in individuals to wrestle responsibility for society away from the state.

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3. Big ambition (Times)

But a leader in the Times says that it is still hard to see how the "Big Society" translates into policy. Cameron appears to have forgotten that the voluntary sector draws most of its funding from public sources.

4. We're getting everything from this election but radicalism (Independent)

As polling day draws closer, the differences between the parties are narrowing not widening, writes Adrian Hamilton. We desperately need a bold approach to a host of challenges, from Afghanistan to Trident to financial reform.

5. Berlin has cut the motor, but now Europe is stalled (Guardian)

Germany once drove the European project but its retreat into British-style self-interest puts the EU at risk, argues Timothy Garton Ash.

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6. Brown's lies and chicanery on immigration are crying out to be exposed by the Tories (Daily Mail)

The Tories should launch an all-out attack on Gordon Brown's misuse of immigration statistics, says Stephen Glover. The party should not be frightened of saying that indigenous workers have been priced out of the job market.

7. Immigration: Speaking softly (Guardian)

Staying with immigration, a Guardian leader says that Brown's attempt to reassure voters will work only if they believe he is telling the truth. The Prime Minister must not use inaccurate data again.

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8. When Beijing and New Delhi pull together (Financial Times)

To bring China and India closer together, the yawning trade deficit between the two countries must be remedied, writes James Lamont.

9. Begin by breaking up the big banks (Guardian)

We will suffer a repeat of the financial crisis if we fail to reform the banks fundamentally, warns Larry Elliott. Politicians must recognise that the main banks remain far too big and far too complex.

10. Serbia says sorry for Srebrenica, but it should go further (Daily Telegraph)

Serbia's apology for the massacre at Srebrenica should acknowledge that what happened there was genocide, argues Harry de Quetteville.

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