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CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Is it a party for middle-class rebels or lefties? (Times)

Daniel Finkelstein says that Nick Clegg has an historic dilemma to solve: whether to unite the left under its leadership, or stick resolutely to the centre, emphasising "newness".

2. A trauma in Britain's placid meadow of political concord (Guardian)

Simon Jenkins looks at the American reaction to Britain's election campaign. People are enjoying the sight of the UK discovering presidentialism, although nothing in the manifestos would turn a hair in an American election.

3. David Cameron's image-makers created the vacuum that Nick Clegg has filled (Daily Telegraph)

The Tories are suffering because they don't have enough solid policies, argues Simon Heffer. David Cameron has no convictions with which to challenge Clegg's novelty value.

4. Are we the next 'new' Europeans? (Independent)

Perhaps we have been too pessismistic about the extent of Euroscepticism among young Britons, Mary Dejevsky suggests. Having been stung by our country's 20-year flirtation with American ways, our social and economic attitudes may be turning towards Europe.

5. Knives out. It's the fatal flaw in Clegg's plan (Times)

Also looking at Britain's relationship with Europe, Anatole Kaletsky warns that the Liberal Democrats are committed to joining the euro. We need only look abroad to see that this would be catastrophic.

6. The challenge of halting the financial doomsday machine (Financial Times)

Tackling "too big to fail" is insufficient, says Martin Wolf. Halting the financial doomsday machine requires fundamental changes of policy towards, and structuring of, the financial system.

7. Cameron and the cities (Guardian)

An editorial explores the Conservative Party's drift into near-irrelevance in most of Britain's cities (excluding London). Nothing in Britain's electoral arithmetic is more striking.

8. Money spent on Trident can't go on troops (Times)

Four former senior military commanders -- Edwin Bramall, David Ramsbotham, Hugh Beach and Patrick Cordingley -- ask if our nuclear deterrent is value for money, in the face of worrying cuts to the defence budget.

9. How our leaders get to grips with a scare story (Financial Times)

John Kay looks at how governments respond to widely publicised dangers. The political incentives are either to downplay risks or exaggerate them, or to do each at different times.

10. Heaven: A fool's paradise (Independent)

Johann Hari wonders why the majority of Britons still believe in life after death. Heaven isn't a wonderful place filled with light -- it is a pernicious construct with a short and bloody history.

 

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